Posers and Puzzles

Posers and Puzzles

  1. Joined
    25 Aug '06
    Moves
    0
    18 Jan '08 13:59
    Given three finite area, two-dimensional pancakes, prove that there exists a circle that cuts the area of each pancake into two equal pieces.
  2. Standard memberPBE6
    Bananarama
    False berry
    Joined
    14 Feb '04
    Moves
    28719
    18 Jan '08 18:49
    Originally posted by David113
    Given three finite area, two-dimensional pancakes, prove that there exists a circle that cuts the area of each pancake into two equal pieces.
    Can these pancakes be rearranged in the plane? Or do they have to stay where they lay on the griddle?
  3. Joined
    25 Aug '06
    Moves
    0
    18 Jan '08 19:56
    Originally posted by PBE6
    Can these pancakes be rearranged in the plane? Or do they have to stay where they lay on the griddle?
    The pancakes can't be rearranged.
  4. Standard memberPBE6
    Bananarama
    False berry
    Joined
    14 Feb '04
    Moves
    28719
    18 Jan '08 20:53
    Originally posted by David113
    The pancakes can't be rearranged.
    Just trying to think of counter-examples. What if you had three square pancakes lined up in a row? I can't think of a circle that would cut all three in half, unless you allow for an infinite radius, in which case the circle becomes a straight line. Is this allowed?
  5. Joined
    31 May '07
    Moves
    696
    18 Jan '08 21:21
    Originally posted by PBE6
    Just trying to think of counter-examples. What if you had three square pancakes lined up in a row? I can't think of a circle that would cut all three in half, unless you allow for an infinite radius, in which case the circle becomes a straight line. Is this allowed?
    I thought this, then thought if you get something that's so almost infinite radius this line is only slightly curved, then you can surely make it cut the three.
  6. Joined
    29 Dec '07
    Moves
    4184
    19 Jan '08 18:15
    A pizza cutter? That would cut all three.

    Are we using euclidean or Non-euclidean geometry?
Back to Top