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Science Forum

  1. Standard member sonhouse
    Fast and Curious
    20 Jun '13 13:42
    http://phys.org/news/2013-06-storage-terabytes-dvd.html#nRlv

    Now THAT is a lot of storage! 50,000 high def movies on one DVD!
  2. 20 Jun '13 18:08
    Originally posted by sonhouse
    http://phys.org/news/2013-06-storage-terabytes-dvd.html#nRlv

    Now THAT is a lot of storage! 50,000 high def movies on one DVD!
    Fantastic. DVDs have practically gone out of use for me because of their low capacity.
    I would think that with that kind of storage a smaller physical format would become possible (and desirable).

    It would be interesting to know what effect it has on reading and writing speed. The current maximum reading speeds for CDs and DVDs are based mainly the maximum rotation speed that is limited because faster rotation would cause the CD/DVD to disintegrate.
    If you have 10 000 times the data density, do you get 10 000 times the reading speed? If so, it could replace hard disks for some types of storage.

    So how many disks will I need to back up the Youtube database?
  3. 20 Jun '13 19:54
    About five years ago I read that there is an ongoing project to sample the ever-changing contents of the Internet periodically, and store the samples for posterity. Some researcher in 2025 would be able to see exactly what was on the Net on June 19, 2013, for instance.

    Good to know that storage media keep improving, which should make it feasible to keep doing samplings like that.
  4. Standard member sonhouse
    Fast and Curious
    20 Jun '13 21:54
    Originally posted by Paul Dirac II
    About five years ago I read that there is an ongoing project to sample the ever-changing contents of the Internet periodically, and store the samples for posterity. Some researcher in 2025 would be able to see exactly what was on the Net on June 19, 2013, for instance.

    Good to know that storage media keep improving, which should make it feasible to keep doing samplings like that.
    Did they say how much data per day that would represent? It must be in the petabytes. Maybe Exabytes. I can't even IMAGINE such an amount of data!
  5. 20 Jun '13 23:43
    Originally posted by sonhouse
    Did they say how much data per day that would represent? It must be in the petabytes. Maybe Exabytes. I can't even IMAGINE such an amount of data!
    If they did say, I don't remember the number. I am not thinking that they claimed their sampling was 100% of the Net's content on that day. (For instance, they may have limited themselves to copying the websites highest on the list of most traffic.)
  6. 21 Jun '13 06:07
    Originally posted by Paul Dirac II
    About five years ago I read that there is an ongoing project to sample the ever-changing contents of the Internet periodically, and store the samples for posterity. Some researcher in 2025 would be able to see exactly what was on the Net on June 19, 2013, for instance.
    They could not sample media like video or sound without crashing the internet. You don't just need storage, you need high bandwidth.
    The advantage of a super high capacity DVD would be that one could actually use it as bandwidth. So for example I could subscribe to Google earth, and they would send me an updated copy of their database once a month complete with the Google Earth data, street view and maps.
    Similarly a subscription to Youtube would get you a DVD with the 200,000 most popular videos of the month plus anything on your subscriptions.
    I realize that for many people bandwidth is no longer such a big problem, but for many of us it would be fantastic.

    I guess would would be harder would be to get a subscription to Pirate Bay with all the latest pirated movies sent to you monthly. I don't think the movie industry would let them get away with that. But it sure would decongest the internet as torrent traffic constitutes a very significant proportion of traffic on the internet.