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  1. Zugzwang
    Joined
    08 Jun '07
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    12 Mar '19 19:452 edits
    First of all, I don't believe there's ONLY ONE way to learn mathematics.
    There may be different learning styles for students with different talents.
    So I disagree with parts of this cited article.

    The author, Barbara Oakley, is a woman who began as very poor in mathematics.
    She became a professor in engineering, NOT in mathematics.
    Note that, as an engineer, she's NEVER required to do any original mathematics.
    All that she has to do is learn how to apply some mathematical techniques.

    So I disagree with her dogma "The building blocks of understanding are
    memorization and repetition", which fail to address creativity in problem-solving.

    I note that she described routine basic undergraduate mathematics
    classes as 'hard' mathematics. That was true for her, but I (like many
    students) found them trivial.

    I am glad that Barbara Oakley found a way that works for her to improve.
    But she's not qualified to understand how real mathematicians
    think when attempting to do non-trivial mathematical work.

    http://nautil.us/issue/40/learning/how-i-rewired-my-brain-to-become-fluent-in-math-rp

    "How I Rewired My Brain to Become Fluent in Math
    The building blocks of understanding are memorization and repetition."
    --Barbara Oakley

    "With my poor understanding of even the simplest math, my post-Army
    retraining efforts began with not-for-credit remedial algebra and trigonometry.
    This was way below mathematical ground zero for most college students.
    Trying to reprogram my brain sometimes seemed like a ridiculous
    idea—especially when I looked at the fresh young faces of my younger
    classmates and realized that many of them had already dropped their
    hard math and science classes—and here I was heading right for them."

    I would add that appearing to understand a teacher's words during a lecture
    does not necessarily mean that one understands how to solve problems.
    Solving problems is the test of understanding.
  2. Standard memberSoothfast
    0,1,1,2,3,5,8,13,21,
    Planet Rain
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    23 Mar '19 01:48
    Of course there is only one way to learn mathematics:

    Through hard work. 😉
  3. Standard memberDeepThought
    Losing the Thread
    Cosmopolis
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    27 Mar '19 02:01
    I don't think this is really about maths as such. I haven't followed the link and am only going by the OP, but I think she's sounding underqualified in the area of educational psychology - as am I, I hasten to add. The sentence "How I rewired my brain..." just sounds like click-bait. Also, as a maths teacher at school used to like saying, practice makes permanent, rather than perfect - one has to be practicing the right thing.
  4. Joined
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    05 Apr '19 20:061 edit
    @soothfast said
    Of course there is only one way to learn mathematics:

    Through hard work. 😉
    Lies!

    Only through torture can one obtain such knowledge.

    It's not of this world.............

    As I've always said, there is education and then there is math.
  5. Zugzwang
    Joined
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    06 Apr '19 03:58
    @soothfast said
    Of course there is only one way to learn mathematics:

    Through hard work. 😉
    There's not necessarily a linear correlation between effort and results in mathematics or chess.
  6. Zugzwang
    Joined
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    06 Apr '19 04:01
    @deepthought said
    I don't think this is really about maths as such. I haven't followed the link and am only going by the OP, but I think she's sounding underqualified in the area of educational psychology - as am I, I hasten to add. The sentence "How I rewired my brain..." just sounds like click-bait. Also, as a maths teacher at school used to like saying, practice makes permanent, rather than perfect - one has to be practicing the right thing.
    Barbara Oakley is an engineer, who uses applied mathematics.
    Engineers are not expected to create original mathematics.
    Engineers are not even expected to prove mathematical theorems
    Engineers just have to learn how to apply mathematics to engineering.
    This is not trivial. But it's also not what research mathematicians do.
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