1. Joined
    06 Mar '12
    Moves
    625
    06 Jul '16 10:348 edits
    The title of this link didn't look at all interesting to me ( "How water gets its exceptional properties" ) but then I read the link anyway and found this very interesting (I think) implication for AI application;

    http://phys.org/news/2016-07-exceptional-properties.html

    "...
    ...Using artificial neural networks, researchers in Bochum and Vienna have examined the atomic interactions of water molecules. Based on their findings, they explain the melting temperature of ice and the density maximum at four degrees Celsius – based solely on computer simulations. The newly developed method is just as precise as quantum mechanical calculations, but is 100.000 times faster.
    ...
    ..."
    Impressive, I think.

    I also bet using artificial neural networks to simulate quantum mechanical effects has huge potential for much if not most of future applied quantum physics research.
  2. Subscribersonhouse
    Fast and Curious
    slatington, pa, usa
    Joined
    28 Dec '04
    Moves
    52619
    06 Jul '16 10:54
    Originally posted by humy
    The title of this link didn't look at all interesting to me ( "How water gets its exceptional properties" ) but then I read the link anyway and found this very interesting (I think) implication for AI application;

    http://phys.org/news/2016-07-exceptional-properties.html

    "...
    ...Using artificial neural networks, researchers in Bochum and Vienna have exami ...[text shortened]... ical effects has huge potential for much if not most of future applied quantum physics research.
    Well it sure beat the best human Go player in a regular timed match!

    Lee Sedol was able to only win 1 game in a 5 game match and he is one of the best Go players on the planet.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/AlphaGo