Please turn on javascript in your browser to play chess.
Science Forum

Science Forum

  1. Standard member sonhouse
    Fast and Curious
    29 Nov '10 23:41
    http://www.physorg.com/news/2010-11-rutgers-scientists-asteroids-dinosaurs.html

    There was a problem with the asteroid theory, namely dino fossils were found above the iridium line, apparently showing some dino's survived the advent of the asteroid(s). This work says in places, the iridium somehow percolated downwards and ruining the timeline there.
  2. 30 Nov '10 00:39
    Perhaps some dinosaurs survived marginally, then died relatively fast after the crash?
  3. Standard member sonhouse
    Fast and Curious
    30 Nov '10 03:02
    Originally posted by PinkFloyd
    Perhaps some dinosaurs survived marginally, then died relatively fast after the crash?
    That could be. The work previously had pointed out fossils above the indium line but they have now shown that if that indium line moved downwards in the soil, the dating is off.
  4. Standard member DeepThought
    Losing the Thread
    30 Nov '10 03:08
    All this took several million years to happen, you'd expect some anomalies in the data. I never really understand why people expect the data to be clean - they have to cope with all sorts of folding in the rock strata.

    Besides, it's only the non-avian dinosaurs which are extinct. When anthropomorphic heating wipes the majority of mammals out it will be the birds turn to dominate again...
  5. Standard member PBE6
    Bananarama
    30 Nov '10 21:27
    Originally posted by DeepThought
    All this took several million years to happen, you'd expect some anomalies in the data. I never really understand why people expect the data to be clean - they have to cope with all sorts of folding in the rock strata.

    Besides, it's only the non-avian dinosaurs which are extinct. When anthropomorphic heating wipes the majority of mammals out it will be the birds turn to dominate again...
    I, for one, welcome our new avian overlords.
  6. Standard member sonhouse
    Fast and Curious
    30 Nov '10 23:26
    Originally posted by PBE6
    I, for one, welcome our new avian overlords.
    Yeah but their demands! I mean really, bird seed in every pot, produced by humans, it's humiliatin I say.
  7. Standard member Bosse de Nage
    Zellulärer Automat
    02 Dec '10 19:26
    Originally posted by PBE6
    I, for one, welcome our new avian overlords.
    Provided they don't crack our heads open and feast on the goo inside.
  8. Standard member sonhouse
    Fast and Curious
    02 Dec '10 23:37
    Originally posted by Bosse de Nage
    Provided they don't crack our heads open and feast on the goo inside.
    Got to admit, that would tend to ruin your day.
  9. 03 Dec '10 15:19
    Originally posted by sonhouse
    Got to admit, that would tend to ruin your day.
    Luckily, they do tend to prefer the flesh. Except for corvids, of course, who just love the eyeballs.

    Richard
  10. Standard member sonhouse
    Fast and Curious
    04 Dec '10 03:16
    Originally posted by Shallow Blue
    Luckily, they do tend to prefer the flesh. Except for corvids, of course, who just love the eyeballs.

    Richard
    hmmm, just like in Kill Bill...
  11. Standard member PBE6
    Bananarama
    06 Dec '10 16:50
    Originally posted by Bosse de Nage
    Provided they don't crack our heads open and feast on the goo inside.
    Precisely!
  12. 12 Dec '10 21:43
    Originally posted by sonhouse
    http://www.physorg.com/news/2010-11-rutgers-scientists-asteroids-dinosaurs.html

    There was a problem with the asteroid theory, namely dino fossils were found above the iridium line, apparently showing some dino's survived the advent of the asteroid(s). This work says in places, the iridium somehow percolated downwards and ruining the timeline there.
    I have never been a believer in the asteroid idea. There are a few other big impact craters around that are not associated with a mass extinction which suggests that the effects of big impacts are not as global as some would like to think. As far as I know, Chicxulub is the only impact that is definitely associated with an extinction event and even that one is dubious. The extinctions started before the space rock hit, a rather inconvenient bit of data for the asteroid theory, and continued after the impact. I suspect the rock from space may just have added to the load of nastiness and helped to finish the job started by Deccan flood basalts.
  13. Standard member sonhouse
    Fast and Curious
    13 Dec '10 07:30
    Originally posted by Diophantus
    I have never been a believer in the asteroid idea. There are a few other big impact craters around that are not associated with a mass extinction which suggests that the effects of big impacts are not as global as some would like to think. As far as I know, Chicxulub is the only impact that is definitely associated with an extinction event and even that o ...[text shortened]... ave added to the load of nastiness and helped to finish the job started by Deccan flood basalts.
    That was the point of the moving iridium line, if it moved downwards in the soil for whatever reason, the dating of fossils would be compromised. Even so, there is on going work suggesting the dino's were on their way out because of climate changes and the Chicxulub asteroid may not have been a total world changer but there is evidence there was more than one asteroid around the same time in the northern hemisphere so they may have been hit with a double whammy. Also, there may have been massive volcanic eruptions on the antipode of the Chicx crater. Still, all in all, the asteroid hit was very close to the extinction event and has to be factored in, world changer or not. Like the straw that broke the camel's back, it hastened an already foregone conclusion.