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Science Forum

  1. Standard member mikelom
    Ajarn
    06 Dec '11 10:54
    http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/science-environment-16040655

    "Astronomers have confirmed the existence of an Earth-like planet in the "habitable zone" around a star not unlike our own.

    The planet, Kepler 22-b, lies about 600 light-years away and is about 2.4 times the size of Earth, and has a temperature of about 22C.

    It is the closest confirmed planet yet to one like ours - an "Earth 2.0".

    Kepler 22-b lies at a distance from its sun about 15% less than the distance from the Earth to the Sun, and its year takes about 290 days. However, its sun puts out about 25% less light, keeping the planet at its balmy temperature that would support the existence of liquid water.

    .................

    I wonder where most astronomical telescopes are pointing now?

    -m.
  2. Subscriber ysterbaard
    AAPS forever
    06 Dec '11 13:33
    What's the chances on light-speed or near-light-speed travelling in the near or not so near future?
  3. 06 Dec '11 13:37
    Originally posted by ysterbaard
    What's the chances on light-speed or near-light-speed travelling in the near or not so near future?
    Define near...


    Near future, nill, zip nada.

    Far future.... maybe, depends which, if any, of our GUT's are right and whether they include the
    possibility of practical FTL travel.

    More likely perhaps is a combination of atomic rocket technology and transhumanism where we use
    relativistic rockets plus A-humans adapted to living in space with extremely extended (biologically immortal)
    lifespans. In which case travelling around the galaxy becomes possible.

    However none of this is likely to be soon.
  4. Standard member mikelom
    Ajarn
    06 Dec '11 15:38
    Originally posted by ysterbaard
    What's the chances on light-speed or near-light-speed travelling in the near or not so near future?
    For man, or for ion rockets and imagined artifacts of olde?

    Ion rockets are BS. Nano-rockets aren't a far cry from becoming a reality.

    We aren't quite able to minimalise and quantify/control human thought on the quantum level yet, but it may be on the cards one day, to enable non-physical far distance travel ITNF simoultaneously, that being maybe 2 centuries.

    -m.
  5. 06 Dec '11 23:32
    Originally posted by mikelom
    For man, or for ion rockets and imagined artifacts of olde?

    Ion rockets are BS. Nano-rockets aren't a far cry from becoming a reality.

    We aren't quite able to minimalise and quantify/control human thought on the quantum level yet, but it may be on the cards one day, to enable non-physical far distance travel ITNF simoultaneously, that being maybe 2 centuries.

    -m.
    Um... what?

    I have no idea what it is you just said.

    Please assume you are talking to people without your Magic, UFO, Theist, New age, decoder ring,
    and try explaining what you mean in plain English.

    For starters Ion drive works rather nicely and has been used quite effectively. (This is in the reality
    we inhabit, no idea what's going on in the one you proclaim to exist in)
  6. Subscriber WoodPush
    Pusher of wood
    07 Dec '11 03:26
    Originally posted by mikelom
    For man, or for ion rockets and imagined artifacts of olde?

    Ion rockets are BS. Nano-rockets aren't a far cry from becoming a reality.

    We aren't quite able to minimalise and quantify/control human thought on the quantum level yet, but it may be on the cards one day, to enable non-physical far distance travel ITNF simoultaneously, that being maybe 2 centuries.

    -m.
  7. Standard member mikelom
    Ajarn
    07 Dec '11 12:00
    Originally posted by googlefudge
    Um... what?

    I have no idea what it is you just said.

    Please assume you are talking to people without your Magic, UFO, Theist, New age, decoder ring,
    and try explaining what you mean in plain English.

    For starters Ion drive works rather nicely and has been used quite effectively. (This is in the reality
    we inhabit, no idea what's going on in the one you proclaim to exist in)
    Refer to the post after my OP. Ask a stupid question = get a stupid answer.

    -m.
  8. 07 Dec '11 19:27
    Originally posted by mikelom
    Refer to the post after my OP. Ask a stupid question = get a stupid answer.

    -m.
    You may want to look up Poe's law.

    http://rationalwiki.org/wiki/Poe%27s_Law
  9. 07 Dec '11 20:38
    Originally posted by googlefudge
    You may want to look up Poe's law.

    http://rationalwiki.org/wiki/Poe%27s_Law
    OOH! OOH! That's totALLY my favorite law! So much that the random capitalization becomes necessary.
  10. 07 Dec '11 22:23
    Originally posted by amolv06
    OOH! OOH! That's totALLY my favorite law! So much that the random capitalization becomes necessary.
    So glad I could make your socks roll up and down ;-)
  11. Standard member mikelom
    Ajarn
    08 Dec '11 11:39
    Originally posted by googlefudge
    You may want to look up Poe's law.

    http://rationalwiki.org/wiki/Poe%27s_Law
    I did, and there is my winkey smilie in full blood.

    I mean, come on googlefudge, what does the rationale of the second post have with any regard, or any relevance, to an earth twin found? It was utter ignoramus in reference to the topic.

    Post rubbish - receive rubbish, that's my motto for this time being.

    -m.
  12. Subscriber FMF
    Main Poster
    11 Dec '11 05:37
    Originally posted by ysterbaard
    What's the chances on light-speed or near-light-speed travelling in the near or not so near future?
    Regardless, we should start teaching Sanskrit in our schools now.
  13. 04 Jan '12 14:19
    Yeah but Mars is in the 'habitable' zone and so is venus. One is too small and has too thin an atmosphere and the other has a runaway greenhouse effect.

    We need to know its mass and its atmospheric composition before we say that it is "Earth's twin".

    --- Penguin
  14. Subscriber WoodPush
    Pusher of wood
    04 Jan '12 23:46
    Originally posted by Penguin
    Yeah but Mars is in the 'habitable' zone and so is venus. One is too small and has too thin an atmosphere and the other has a runaway greenhouse effect.

    We need to know its mass and its atmospheric composition before we say that it is "Earth's twin".

    --- Penguin
    Well, since they confirmed the temperature your comparison isn't fair. Both mars and venus would have been ruled out.

    But still, you're right, it's a little premature to call it earth's twin.