1. Subscribersonhouse
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    21 Sep '17 19:25
    https://medicalxpress.com/news/2017-09-exosomes-link-insulin-resistance-diabetes.html

    I wonder how long it will take to go from this to a human treatment since this work was done on mice.
  2. Joined
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    22 Sep '17 08:594 edits
    Originally posted by @sonhouse
    https://medicalxpress.com/news/2017-09-exosomes-link-insulin-resistance-diabetes.html

    I wonder how long it will take to go from this to a human treatment since this work was done on mice.
    That truly is a great bit of research!
    I am particularly extremely impresses where that link says

    "...A team led by Olefsky, associate dean for scientific affairs, took macrophages found in adipose tissue of obese mice and harvested their exosomes. Lean, healthy mouse models were treated with these "obese" exosomes and once-normal mice began exhibiting obesity-induced insulin resistance despite not being overweight.

    When reversing the process, the team found that they could restore insulin sensitivity to obese mice by treating them with exosomes from lean mice. The obese mice remained overweight, but were metabolically healthy.

    Similarly, during an in vitro study, when human liver and fat cells were treated with "obese" exosomes, these cells became insulin resistant. Conversely, when they were treated with "lean" macrophage exosomes, they became highly sensitive to insulin..."

    What a FANTASTIC piece of research work!

    But it also says;
    "Olefsky estimates there are probably several hundred miRNAs in exosomes, but only 20 to 30 are key. Determining which miRNAs to target will require more research, "

    And I am betting it would unfortunately take quite a while before those "20 to 30" are identified and properly researched for drug targets and then effective drugs designed and tested.
    But, still, this is still a fantastic breakthrough!

    ANYONE;

    Is there anyone here knowledgeable enough about this to hazard a guess of about how long it would take before this would lead to effective drugs being used to treat diabetic humans?
  3. Subscribersonhouse
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    22 Sep '17 11:37
    Originally posted by @humy
    That truly is a great bit of research!
    I am particularly extremely impresses where that link says

    "...A team led by Olefsky, associate dean for scientific affairs, took macrophages found in adipose tissue of obese mice and harvested their exosomes. Lean, healthy mouse models were treated with these "obese" exosomes and once-normal mice began exhibiting obe ...[text shortened]... ong it would take before this would lead to effective drugs being used to treat diabetic humans?
    Ususally it is about ten years unless they want to push it.
  4. Joined
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    22 Sep '17 12:211 edit
    Originally posted by @sonhouse
    Ususally it is about ten years unless they want to push it.
    that's an unususal spelling for ususally.
    I think they should push it.

    https://www.cdc.gov/nchs/fastats/diabetes.htm
    "...
    Number of deaths: 76,488
    Deaths per 100,000 population: 24.0
    Cause of death rank: 7
    ..."

    Each year of delay means thousands of more deaths.
  5. Subscribersonhouse
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    22 Sep '17 13:13
    Originally posted by @humy
    that's an unususal spelling for ususally.
    I think they should push it.

    https://www.cdc.gov/nchs/fastats/diabetes.htm
    "...
    Number of deaths: 76,488
    Deaths per 100,000 population: 24.0
    Cause of death rank: 7
    ..."

    Each year of delay means thousands of more deaths.
    I goofed, Usu Sally was a former gf🙂
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