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Science Forum

  1. Standard member sonhouse
    Fast and Curious
    29 Nov '08 17:35
    Would the pitch be the same? If not what would it sound like? Has anyone ever heard of it being tried? Shouldn't be too hard, just take your strad, the worse one in the collection and try it...
  2. 29 Nov '08 21:58
    Originally posted by sonhouse
    Would the pitch be the same? If not what would it sound like? Has anyone ever heard of it being tried? Shouldn't be too hard, just take your strad, the worse one in the collection and try it...
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=62zjlrAruZk
  3. Standard member sonhouse
    Fast and Curious
    30 Nov '08 03:27 / 2 edits
    Originally posted by ThinkOfOne
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=62zjlrAruZk
    Well that was interesting! Too bad the dude can't play! I would like to see instrumentation in place to measure the pitch, I didn't see hydrophones, only the sound of the violin that escaped the surface of the water, at least that's what it seemed like. I would like to see hydrophones record the sound and to demonstrate the actual pitch as perceived underwater. The pitch as heard in the video was the same as the sound of it underwater which pretty much proves it was sound recorded above the surface where you would hear normal air frequencies, the pitch should change a lot because of the increased speed of sound underwater. These were just kids trying an experiment. I would like to see a real scientific project with real instrumentation. Still interesting though, also would like to have a translation from whatever language that was, Swedish? Dutch? At the very least, it proved a violin can produce sound underwater.
    I would like to see this girl play underwater:
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UkwmegN-mZ0&feature=related
  4. 30 Nov '08 05:09
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vlpxoi8lyUc&feature=related

    It appears to sound similar underwater.
  5. Standard member sonhouse
    Fast and Curious
    30 Nov '08 06:01
    Originally posted by mlprior
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vlpxoi8lyUc&feature=related

    It appears to sound similar underwater.
    You are naive.
  6. Standard member bill718
    Enigma
    30 Nov '08 08:00
    Originally posted by sonhouse
    Would the pitch be the same? If not what would it sound like? Has anyone ever heard of it being tried? Shouldn't be too hard, just take your strad, the worse one in the collection and try it...
    Is this really the most imporntant thing you have to think about??
  7. 30 Nov '08 08:35
    Originally posted by mlprior
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vlpxoi8lyUc&feature=related

    It appears to sound similar underwater.
    I don't think so.

    I think the viscosity and density of the medium in which the violin is played has an important role how the sounds is generated.
  8. 30 Nov '08 15:19
    Originally posted by sonhouse
    You are naive.
  9. 30 Nov '08 16:30
    Originally posted by FabianFnas
    I don't think so.

    I think the viscosity and density of the medium in which the violin is played has an important role how the sounds is generated.
    Indeed, for one the increased viscosity will make the vibrations stop more quickly, also resulting in a timbre change because the higher frequency modes will die out almost instantaneously.
  10. 01 Dec '08 09:59
    The sound will not resemble the acoustical sound of a violin. Obviously, the resonator box will not have a hand in the sound generation. The sound produced in the air by a violin is complex, with undertones and overtones surrounding the fundamental note. That is why a guitar sounds different from a cello - they are similar size and pitch but the guitar is producing much more of the fundamental tone without the overtones and undertones.

    What would be heard from a violin being played under water would be sound that is much more fundamental. It would be the same as if one were using a transducer pickup on the violin bridge or playing a mute violin. The pitch, however, would not be changed. Water does not alter sound in and of itself. It is a far better conductor of sound than air is, though.
  11. 01 Dec '08 13:23
    Everyone inhaling helium and hear himself talk knows that the pitch changes with the density and viscosity of the medium in which the sound is produced...
  12. Standard member sonhouse
    Fast and Curious
    01 Dec '08 14:42
    Originally posted by mlprior
    You didn't see that whole thing as a stunt? They were not playing those instruments underwater, some of them would never have made a sound at all, thought you would have noticed that.
  13. Standard member sonhouse
    Fast and Curious
    01 Dec '08 14:47
    Originally posted by Badwater
    The sound will not resemble the acoustical sound of a violin. Obviously, the resonator box will not have a hand in the sound generation. The sound produced in the air by a violin is complex, with undertones and overtones surrounding the fundamental note. That is why a guitar sounds different from a cello - they are similar size and pitch but the guitar is p ...[text shortened]... oes not alter sound in and of itself. It is a far better conductor of sound than air is, though.
    I deg to biffer with you on the guitar. The reason it sounds like it does is because it is a percussive instrument, anything that plucks strings from mandolin to guitar to harpsichord are all percussive and anything bowed is more continuous toned obviously both have overtones (harmonics) and such but the main difference in plucked instruments is the percussive effect, a tone that starts and stops more abruptly than the cello/violin bowed instruments.
  14. Standard member PBE6
    Bananarama
    01 Dec '08 16:08
    Originally posted by sonhouse
    I deg to biffer with you on the guitar. The reason it sounds like it does is because it is a percussive instrument, anything that plucks strings from mandolin to guitar to harpsichord are all percussive and anything bowed is more continuous toned obviously both have overtones (harmonics) and such but the main difference in plucked instruments is the percussive effect, a tone that starts and stops more abruptly than the cello/violin bowed instruments.
    There's only one way to settle this...get Noodles to play her cello with a pick and record it for us. Actually, I'm going to ask her right now!
  15. 01 Dec '08 16:12 / 2 edits
    I go and ask my neighbors kid if he knows how his drums sound like under water.
    Then I perhaps will have some peace and quiet around...