Science Forum

Science Forum

  1. Joined
    22 Sep '20
    Moves
    2987
    15 Nov '20 21:35
    @humy said
    Yes, but the essence of the philosophical OP problem of this thread isn't a problem of what physically defines color but rather, and even if and when there are no differences between how our physical eyes respond to color, how do we know we all share the same private color sensory sensation in our minds when we physically see the same physical color of, say, color green. How, fo ...[text shortened]... ical green is more like your color sensory sensation of, say, blue rather than green, or vice versa?
    This.
  2. Standard memberbadradger
    Dandy Highwayman
    the pie shop
    Joined
    09 Sep '18
    Moves
    16934
    16 Nov '20 10:59
    @sonhouse said
    @badradger
    It also turns out color blind folks have a compensation:
    They see many shades of gray and have been used by military to identify enemy blinds and such that normal folks would not be able to discern.
    They really do see 50 shades of gray.
    when we had a black and white tv back in the 60s my son swore he could tell the colour of clothing by its shade of grey.
  3. Joined
    22 Sep '20
    Moves
    2987
    17 Nov '20 00:13
    @badradger said
    when we had a black and white tv back in the 60s my son swore he could tell the colour of clothing by its shade of grey.
    I believe it 🤔
  4. SubscriberPonderableonline
    chemist
    Linkenheim
    Joined
    22 Apr '05
    Moves
    580504
    17 Nov '20 11:57
    @cheesemaster said
    I believe it 🤔
    you can also have quite an interesting Theory if you read Goethes take on this.

    Starting Point: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Theory_of_Colours
  5. Joined
    22 Sep '20
    Moves
    2987
    17 Nov '20 18:42
    I see people have been arguing about color for hundreds of years 🤔
    Interesting article. Too smart for me to understand all of it though.
  6. Standard memberlemon lime
    itiswhatitis
    oLd ScHoOl
    Joined
    31 May '13
    Moves
    5577
    18 Nov '20 03:451 edit
    @badradger said
    when we had a black and white tv back in the 60s my son swore he could tell the colour of clothing by its shade of grey.
    Grey levels are one of the factors used in the colorization of black and white films. It's a complicated process, and still requires human input to guess (if it's not known) what color an object is or might be. And sometimes you can catch mistakes if you happen to know what color something is supposed to be.

    I once saw a colorized version of an old Superman episode where a little guy was supposed to be a Martian with green hair. But his hair was red. Whoever did the colorization of that film either didn't know the story line, or something went wrong in the colorization process and no one bothered to fix it, probably due to budgetary constraints. Either way it was very entertaining to hear the actors talking about the little Martian's "green" hair.
Back to Top