1. Subscribersonhouse
    Fast and Curious
    slatington, pa, usa
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    26 Mar '15 10:42
    http://phys.org/news/2015-03-opelvauxhall-headlamps-driver-eyes.html

    Sounds doable.
  2. Joined
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    26 Mar '15 10:46
    Originally posted by sonhouse
    http://phys.org/news/2015-03-opelvauxhall-headlamps-driver-eyes.html

    Sounds doable.
    Equipments that follow your eyes isn't a new technology.
    Couldn't be hard to make the headlights follow them.

    But it is somewhat embarrassing when you meet a pretty woman on the road and her butt will be lit up by my lights. 😞
  3. Subscribersonhouse
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    26 Mar '15 12:31
    Originally posted by FabianFnas
    Equipments that follow your eyes isn't a new technology.
    Couldn't be hard to make the headlights follow them.

    But it is somewhat embarrassing when you meet a pretty woman on the road and her butt will be lit up by my lights. 😞
    And what happens if you have an unruly kid in the back seat, you turn to discipline the brat......
  4. Standard memberDeepThought
    Losing the Thread
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    26 Mar '15 19:36
    Nice idea, but there's a problem. If the beam is pointed directly at what one looks at then drivers will be dazzling each other as they look straight at the front windscreen of the oncoming cars. The system has somehow to be able to distinguish between the driver looking ahead into the distance, with no oncoming traffic - good time for main beam - from the driver looking at an oncoming vehicle - bad time for main beam.
  5. Subscribersonhouse
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    28 Mar '15 15:59
    Originally posted by DeepThought
    Nice idea, but there's a problem. If the beam is pointed directly at what one looks at then drivers will be dazzling each other as they look straight at the front windscreen of the oncoming cars. The system has somehow to be able to distinguish between the driver looking ahead into the distance, with no oncoming traffic - good time for main beam - from the driver looking at an oncoming vehicle - bad time for main beam.
    I think they worked that into the algorithm for following eyes. They don't want to blind oncoming drivers. It's a pretty smart system.
  6. Cape Town
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    29 Mar '15 06:26
    Originally posted by sonhouse
    http://phys.org/news/2015-03-opelvauxhall-headlamps-driver-eyes.html

    Sounds doable.
    Its doable, but I see no benefits and a number of downsides.
    1. It would be distracting to other drivers if your headlights are waving around.
    2. You can't look up where you would blind oncoming traffic or the car in front.
    3. It would be dark where you are not looking, which is exactly where the danger is most likely to be.
    4. Cars are not desperately short of power. A good well spread beam using LED lighting should be able to illuminate anywhere reasonable that you are likely to look anyway.

    A better system would be one that identifies object in front of the car and illuminates them - such as that cyclist in dark clothing that you didn't spot.
  7. Joined
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    01 Apr '15 14:37
    Originally posted by twhitehead
    A better system would be one that identifies object in front of the car and illuminates them - such as that cyclist in dark clothing that you didn't spot.
    Good idea, but it wouldn't work: the SMIDSY field is strong enough to overpower any car light.
  8. Joined
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    01 Apr '15 17:29
    Use infra-red lighting [and lidar/radar/sonar] and a HUD.

    Doesn't blind anyone, and allows you to see everything as clear as day.
  9. Joined
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    02 Apr '15 06:03
    Originally posted by twhitehead
    A better system would be one that identifies object in front of the car and illuminates them - such as that cyclist in dark clothing that you didn't spot.
    And that could be done with infrared cameras, even ultraviolet cameras.

    In Sweden, Finland, and Norway, where there are many collisions with mooses (Many people have died in these collisions (and the animals themselves), a quite big problem in lesser populated areas.). Reindeers (up in the north) experiments has been done with UV-light, with promising results. No cameras, just plain UV-ligth.
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