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Science Forum

  1. 29 Aug '08 00:23
    I have been trying to convince my co-worker that Cilantro has a chelating agent in it. There are plenty of articles on the possible chelating effects of Cilantro and studies that have been done on mice.

    The only problem, I can't seem to find anywhere what that chelating agent is and if it can cross the blood-brain barrier.

    Does anyone know the answer to this?
  2. Subscriber AThousandYoung
    Do ya think?
    29 Aug '08 01:09 / 1 edit
    Originally posted by mlprior
    I have been trying to convince my co-worker that Cilantro has a chelating agent in it. There are plenty of articles on the possible chelating effects of Cilantro and studies that have been done on mice.

    The only problem, I can't seem to find anywhere what that chelating agent is and if it can cross the blood-brain barrier.

    Does anyone know the answer to this?
    I'm clueless. I'd never even heard of a "chelating agent" before. Try these forums and this database if you don't get a good answer here.

    http://www.chemicool.com/forum/
    http://www.biology-online.org/biology-forum/
    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/sites/entrez?db=pubmed
  3. Subscriber AThousandYoung
    Do ya think?
    29 Aug '08 01:11
    This site gives a name - Dr. Yoshiaki Omura.

    http://www.bellaonline.com/articles/art7738.asp
  4. Subscriber AThousandYoung
    Do ya think?
    29 Aug '08 01:16 / 1 edit
    However, these mercury deposits, which commonly occur in such cases, were successfully eliminated by the oral intake of 100 mg tablet of Chinese parsley (Cilantro) 4 times a day (for average weight adults) with a number of drug-uptake enhancement methods developed by the 1st author, including different stimulation methods on the accurate organ representation areas of the hands (which have been mapped using the Bi-Digital O-Ring Test), without injections of chelating agents.

    http://tinyurl.com/65x6ch


    It sounds impressive, but I'm suspicious. This is an acupuncture journal and I believe refers to stimulating organs via the hand which seems to be getting into the realm of voodoo science.
  5. Subscriber AThousandYoung
    Do ya think?
    29 Aug '08 01:20
    Here are 7 pages of "Omura Y." publications. I'm not seeing much that looks like it will shed light on the topic on a cursory scan.

    http://tinyurl.com/5l85qd
  6. Subscriber AThousandYoung
    Do ya think?
    29 Aug '08 02:18
    Preventive effect of Coriandrum sativum (Chinese parsley) on localized lead deposition in ICR mice.Aga M, Iwaki K, Ueda Y, Ushio S, Masaki N, Fukuda S, Kimoto T, Ikeda M, Kurimoto M.
    Hayashibara Biochemical Laboratories, Inc., Fujisaki Institute, 675-1 Fujisaki, Okayama 702-8006, Japan.

    The preventive effect of Coriandrum sativum, Fam. UMBELLIFERAE (Chinese parsley) on lead deposition was investigated in male ICR mice given lead (1000 ppm) as lead acetate trihydrate in drinking water for 32 days. Administration of Chinese parsley to mice by gastric intubation was performed for 25 days from day 7 after the start of lead exposure up to the end of the experiment. The mice were then sacrificed for comparison of lead distribution. The lead reached its highest concentration in the femur but localized lead deposition in the femur was significantly decreased by meso-2,3-dimercaptosuccinic acid (DMSA), a chelating agent used as a positive control to validate this experimental model. Administration of Chinese parsley also significantly decreased lead deposition in the femur and severe lead-induced injury in the kidneys. In addition, urinary excretion of delta-aminolevulinic acid (ALA) which is known to increase with lead intake was significantly decreased after administration of Chinese parsley. The MeOH extract of Chinese parsley also reduced lead-induced inhibition of delta-aminolevulinic acid dehydratase (ALAD) activity in vitro. These results suggest that Chinese parsley has suppressive activity on lead deposition, probably resulting from the chelation of lead by some substances contained in Chinese parsley.


    http://tinyurl.com/6xfwts
  7. 29 Aug '08 02:20
    Originally posted by AThousandYoung
    [i]However, these mercury deposits, which commonly occur in such cases, were successfully eliminated by the oral intake of 100 mg tablet of Chinese parsley (Cilantro) 4 times a day (for average weight adults) with a number of drug-uptake enhancement methods developed by the 1st author, including different stimulation methods on the accurate organ repr ...[text shortened]... to stimulating organs via the hand which seems to be getting into the realm of voodoo science.
    I'm skeptical also.

    I'm sure it has some chelating action in the liver or other organs but I doubt it can cross into the brain.

    Another down side, it is possible that it may also remove important elements such as iron and calcium from your body.
  8. Subscriber AThousandYoung
    Do ya think?
    29 Aug '08 02:24 / 3 edits
    Originally posted by mlprior
    I'm skeptical also.

    I'm sure it has some chelating action in the liver or other organs but I doubt it can cross into the brain.

    Another down side, it is possible that it may also remove important elements such as iron and calcium from your body.
    The research I've found suggests it removes lead via a chelating agent.

    True, it could do that. Well...that's not hard to search either. Cilantro and Anemia...no results.
  9. Standard member sonhouse
    Fast and Curious
    29 Aug '08 16:55
    Originally posted by AThousandYoung
    The research I've found suggests it removes lead via a chelating agent.

    True, it could do that. Well...that's not hard to search either. Cilantro and Anemia...no results.
    That would suck, how do make a decent taco without Cilantro?
  10. 14 Sep '08 13:20
    A chelating agent is a chemical compound that has a chain which acts as a "bay area" and traps a certain species. After this it forms a ring of about 5-6 sides, depending on the chelating species and the chelated one.

    Most chelating species (if not all) have a conjugated electron pair once they're paired up with the chelated species, which gives a different color.

    That is the mechanism used to remove some toxic compounds. For the compound to be removed, it has to have some specific characteristics, which I don't know much about except that it should form conjugated electron pairs between them and the chelating species.