1. Standard memberPalynka
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    06 Aug '10 10:361 edit
    Still a prototype. Good or bad idea?
    http://www.chinahush.com/2010/07/31/straddling-bus-a-cheaper-greener-and-faster-alternative-to-commute/
  2. Germany
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    06 Aug '10 11:10
    Hmm, I'm not sure how much space they need, but for high-capacity, medium-speed transport, can't you simply use trams? Trams don't take up much space and are a lot cheaper and easier to build.
  3. Standard memberPalynka
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    06 Aug '10 12:262 edits
    Originally posted by KazetNagorra
    Hmm, I'm not sure how much space they need, but for high-capacity, medium-speed transport, can't you simply use trams? Trams don't take up much space and are a lot cheaper and easier to build.
    Seems like the whole point of this is the view that trams/buses/trolleys do take up significant space (despite the title strangely focusing on cost and pollution).
  4. Subscribersonhouse
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    06 Aug '10 14:25
    Originally posted by Palynka
    Seems like the whole point of this is the view that trams/buses/trolleys do take up significant space (despite the title strangely focusing on cost and pollution).
    I wonder if it will be big enough for trucks to drive underneath? Also what happens when the inevitable accident occurs?
  5. Standard memberPalynka
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    06 Aug '10 14:49
    Originally posted by sonhouse
    I wonder if it will be big enough for trucks to drive underneath? Also what happens when the inevitable accident occurs?
    Well, the video seems to suggest trucks would not be able to drive underneath. I think accidents are the first issue that comes to mind, but is it a problem for the concept itself? I'm not sure. For example, motorway type barriers could still be put so that the cars don't actually hit the moving bus.
  6. Germany
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    06 Aug '10 15:49
    Originally posted by Palynka
    Well, the video seems to suggest trucks would not be able to drive underneath. I think accidents are the first issue that comes to mind, but is it a problem for the concept itself? I'm not sure. For example, motorway type barriers could still be put so that the cars don't actually hit the moving bus.
    Accidents happen with trams too. However, I think this sort of vehicle will find the tracks blocked very often.
  7. SubscriberAThousandYoung
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    06 Aug '10 17:50
    Neeto! It would work especially well on freeways.
  8. Subscribersonhouse
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    06 Aug '10 20:16
    Originally posted by AThousandYoung
    Neeto! It would work especially well on freeways.
    If it was tall enough to allow truck traffic. I would think if it did allow trucks to go under, it would be unstable, top heavy. I would think tracks would have to be added to control tipping. The image shows it with rubber tires.
  9. Cape Town
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    06 Aug '10 20:271 edit
    Originally posted by Palynka
    Still a prototype. Good or bad idea?
    It looks like it would need straight roads (similar to rail requirements or even straiter), so finding suitable sites might be difficult. Also it would probably have to follow the center of a freeway making the choice of destinations limited.

    The only real benefit over an electric tram seems to be space saving, but I am not convinced that is significant. If electric trams can keep up with traffic then they only take up several times their length which cant be that much of a saving considering all the disadvantages.
  10. Subscribersonhouse
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    06 Aug '10 23:21
    Originally posted by twhitehead
    It looks like it would need straight roads (similar to rail requirements or even straiter), so finding suitable sites might be difficult. Also it would probably have to follow the center of a freeway making the choice of destinations limited.

    The only real benefit over an electric tram seems to be space saving, but I am not convinced that is significan ...[text shortened]... everal times their length which cant be that much of a saving considering all the disadvantages.
    Electric trains can't do auto traffic at the same time. This idea's advantage is you don't have to built a railway, I think their design is using regular bus tires, I don't see a rail on the drawing anyway. If it can't accommodate trucks then that lane would be limited to auto traffic so it wouldn't help logistics companies that much.

    I just had a flash, the same idea could be made to carry cargo also! Doesn't have to carry just passengers.
  11. Cape Town
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    07 Aug '10 07:37
    Originally posted by sonhouse
    Electric trains can't do auto traffic at the same time.
    But trams can, cant they? This vehicle is more like a long tram than a train.

    This idea's advantage is you don't have to built a railway, I think their design is using regular bus tires, I don't see a rail on the drawing anyway.
    They also suggest either rails or tires that follow a predefined track. It would likely require resurfacing the road at a minimum, possibly a lot more.

    If it can't accommodate trucks then that lane would be limited to auto traffic so it wouldn't help logistics companies that much.
    It looks like it would be the inner two lanes of a freeway, and quite often trucks are meant to stay in the outer slow lanes anyway.
    They suggest it has to fit under over passes, but over traffic, so making it as high as a truck is not optional. I do foresee accidents where a vehicle too high to fit under crashes into it (as frequently happens with low bridges). But since they will typically be going in the same direction, that might reduce the impact.

    One concern is that it might be very confusing for a driver going though it. Imagine driving through a short tunnel that is moving at 60km/h. I guess it would be similar to going between two rows of buses.

    I just had a flash, the same idea could be made to carry cargo also! Doesn't have to carry just passengers.
    The limited routes would make it equivalent to rail transport.
  12. SubscriberAThousandYoung
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    07 Aug '10 17:27
    Wait, this thing doesn't have tracks? I thought it was on rails. This thing on tires sounds dangerous.

    It could be segmented to go on curves...
  13. Subscribersonhouse
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    07 Aug '10 18:00
    Originally posted by AThousandYoung
    Wait, this thing doesn't have tracks? I thought it was on rails. This thing on tires sounds dangerous.

    It could be segmented to go on curves...
    There are already segmented buses, they do the job.
  14. SubscriberAThousandYoung
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    07 Aug '10 18:03
    Originally posted by sonhouse
    There are already segmented buses, they do the job.
    They take up a lot of space on the road.

    I've been on one...it's very entertaining to stand in the segmentation as the bus drives.
  15. Subscribersonhouse
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    07 Aug '10 18:47
    Originally posted by AThousandYoung
    They take up a lot of space on the road.

    I've been on one...it's very entertaining to stand in the segmentation as the bus drives.
    Been there, done that! They have them in LA. I was born in El Monte.
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