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Science Forum

  1. Standard memberwolfgang59
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    04 Jul '20 02:32
    Just discovered this ....

    Two adjacent fibonacci numbers will give you a good
    approximation for converting kilometres to miles!

    Crazy.
  2. Subscriberjoe shmo
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    04 Jul '20 03:23
    @wolfgang59 said
    Just discovered this ....

    Two adjacent fibonacci numbers will give you a good
    approximation for converting kilometres to miles!

    Crazy.
    Yes, that is odd!
  3. Joined
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    04 Jul '20 11:511 edit
    I believe that Fibonnacci numbers will eventually give 'the golden ratio', which happens to be 1.6ish
  4. Zugzwang
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    04 Jul '20 12:35
    @wolfgang59 said
    Just discovered this ....

    Two adjacent fibonacci numbers will give you a good
    approximation for converting kilometres to miles!

    Crazy.
    "The relationship of the Fibonacci sequence to the golden ratio is this: The ratio of each successive pair of numbers in the sequence approximates Phi (1.618. . .) , as 5 divided by 3 is 1.666…, and 8 divided by 5 is 1.60.

    The table below shows how the ratios of the successive numbers in the Fibonacci sequence quickly converge on Phi. After the 40th number in the sequence, the ratio is accurate to 15 decimal places.

    1.618033988749895 ."
  5. Subscribersonhouse
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    04 Jul '20 14:101 edit
    @Duchess64
    It was all a conspiracy to propagate the knowledge of Fibonacci numbers. It was done in secret meeting in wall street and in the queen's palace. They kind of screwed it up however, not totally accurate between kilometers and miles, which was put down to miscommunications between the queen's mathematicians and Wall street math guru's.
  6. SubscriberKevin Eleven
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    04 Jul '20 16:51
    Something that only a few people have noticed is that in recent years, the ratio between a kilometer and a mile has more and more closely approximated Phi, but such observations are usually dismissed as the loony conspiracy theories of Mandela-effect ravers.
  7. Standard memberDeepThought
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    04 Jul '20 21:39
    @caesar-salad said
    Something that only a few people have noticed is that in recent years, the ratio between a kilometer and a mile has more and more closely approximated Phi, but such observations are usually dismissed as the loony conspiracy theories of Mandela-effect ravers.
    What?
  8. Standard memberwolfgang59
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    04 Jul '20 23:35
    @blood-on-the-tracks said
    I believe that Fibonnacci numbers will eventually give 'the golden ratio', which happens to be 1.6ish
    Yes that is correct, just a huge coincidence that the conversion
    rate between km and miles is roughly the Golden Ratio.
  9. Standard memberwolfgang59
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    04 Jul '20 23:36
    @caesar-salad said
    Something that only a few people have noticed is that in recent years, the ratio between a kilometer and a mile has more and more closely approximated Phi, but such observations are usually dismissed as the loony conspiracy theories of Mandela-effect ravers.
    Are kilometres getting bigger or miles getting smaller? 😉
  10. Standard memberSoothfast
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    05 Jul '20 01:46
    @wolfgang59 said
    Are kilometres getting bigger or miles getting smaller? 😉
    As the universe expands both are growing longer in a manner that preserves the ratio. That's gotta be it.
  11. Zugzwang
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    05 Jul '20 02:01
    @sonhouse said
    @Duchess64
    It was all a conspiracy to propagate the knowledge of Fibonacci numbers. It was done in secret meeting in wall street and in the queen's palace. They kind of screwed it up however, not totally accurate between kilometers and miles, which was put down to miscommunications between the queen's mathematicians and Wall street math guru's.
    What every rabbit already knows

    'Fibonacci posed the theoretical problem as follows:
    Imagine you have a pair of rabbits, one male and one female in a field. How many rabbits will they produce after one year?
    Fibonacci made the following assumptions:
    1. No rabbits die or are eaten by predators
    2. Each female reproduces every month, starting from the second month that she is alive.
    3. Every time the female reproduces she gives birth to one pair of rabbits – (one male and one female).'
  12. Zugzwang
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    05 Jul '20 02:081 edit
    @sonhouse said
    @Duchess64
    It was all a conspiracy to propagate the knowledge of Fibonacci numbers. It was done in secret meeting in wall street and in the queen's palace. They kind of screwed it up however, not totally accurate between kilometers and miles, which was put down to miscommunications between the queen's mathematicians and Wall street math guru's.
    Westerners like to give other Westerners original credit for what was already known to non-Westerners.

    Fibonacci numbers were known in India long before Fibonacci.

    Historia Mathematica
    Volume 12, Issue 3, August 1985, Pages 229-244
    "The so-called fibonacci numbers in ancient and medieval India"
    by Parmanand Singh

    https://doi.org/10.1016/0315-0860(85)90021-7

    Abstract
    What are generally referred to as the Fibonacci numbers and the method for their formation were given by Virah
    a
    ṅka (between a.d. 600 and 800), Gop
    a
    la (prior to a.d. 1135) and Hemacandra (c. a.d. 1150), all prior to L. Fibonacci (c. a.d. 1202). N
    ..
    ita (a.d. 1356) established a relation between his s
    ma
    sik
    a
    -paṅkti, which contains Fibonacci numbers as a particular case, and “the multinomial coefficients.”"
  13. SubscriberKevin Eleven
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    05 Jul '20 21:50
    @wolfgang59 said
    Are kilometres getting bigger or miles getting smaller? 😉
    That might depend on fluctuations in the Bergsonian Constant.
  14. SubscriberKevin Eleven
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    05 Jul '20 22:002 edits
    @duchess64 said
    Westerners like to give other Westerners original credit for what was already known to non-Westerners.

    Fibonacci numbers were known in India long before Fibonacci.

    Historia Mathematica
    Volume 12, Issue 3, August 1985, Pages 229-244
    "The so-called fibonacci numbers in ancient and medieval India"
    by Parmanand Singh

    https://doi.org/10.1016/0315-0860(85)90021-7

    A ...[text shortened]... -paṅkti, which contains Fibonacci numbers as a particular case, and “the multinomial coefficients.”"
    Dear yet sometimes (often?) deplorable Duchess, that is interesting information, but I wish you had taken the time to deal with the line breaks, which would have been the respectful thing to do.

    You might be surprised how many lying racist trolls are aware of their blindered education and are keenly interested in the history of scientific and philosophical developments all around the globe.
  15. SubscriberKevin Eleven
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    05 Jul '20 22:13
    @blood-on-the-tracks said
    I believe that Fibonnacci numbers will eventually give 'the golden ratio', which happens to be 1.6ish
    I somehow landed on that about 40 years ago when I was a young painter (at the time, I also tried mapping the optical-complement color wheel against the 12-tone musical scale -- I think Newton did something similar, much earlier).
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