1. SubscriberAThousandYoung
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    21 Jun '10 02:12
    A close friend with a Ph.D in genetics; a man I respect greatly; first told me about this. Is it true? Who knows?

    http://www.rense.com/general88/MScure.htm
  2. Subscribersonhouse
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    21 Jun '10 04:46
    Originally posted by AThousandYoung
    A close friend with a Ph.D in genetics; a man I respect greatly; first told me about this. Is it true? Who knows?

    http://www.rense.com/general88/MScure.htm
    I hope this is actually a cure. But I note this Rense dude has a site that has to be the poster child for conspiracy theories. Did you look at the main site?
  3. SubscriberAThousandYoung
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    21 Jun '10 04:48
    Originally posted by sonhouse
    I hope this is actually a cure. But I note this Rense dude has a site that has to be the poster child for conspiracy theories. Did you look at the main site?
    No; but like I said, a man I very much respect told me about this. He is an expert...
  4. Subscribersonhouse
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    23 Jun '10 02:532 edits
    Originally posted by AThousandYoung
    No; but like I said, a man I very much respect told me about this. He is an expert...
    My wife has a friend in Ohio who has MS, which is who I was thinking about when I read this report. My wife also thought something interesting: If excess iron in the brain is the root cause of MS, could chelation therapy have a beneficial effect? If constricted arteries cause iron concentrations, does it happen in other parts of the body? maybe with no problem in any other part of the body but the brain? If so, could iron concentrations be measured in other parts of the body, especially where constricted arteries are seen? And if so, why? What does constriction of arteries have to do with iron concentrations?

    One possible answer: Iron is preferentially carried in the blood, carried more efficiently than other minerals for some odd reason and if the flow of blood is restricted, iron still gets through. Just a half baked theory.
  5. silicon valley
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    23 Jun '10 05:28
    maybe our great-great grans were on to something when they bled patients.

    nowadays you here that people who aren't growing (kids) or bleeding (women of menstrual age) should avoid iron supplements and red meat.

    maybe the old doctors had it figured out.
  6. Subscribersonhouse
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    23 Jun '10 16:27
    Originally posted by zeeblebot
    maybe our great-great grans were on to something when they bled patients.

    nowadays you here that people who aren't growing (kids) or bleeding (women of menstrual age) should avoid iron supplements and red meat.

    maybe the old doctors had it figured out.
    It presumably isn't that simple or simply reducing iron would have cured MS decades ago. I think it is more likely, if the iron hypothesis is correct, that normal amounts of iron in the patient's blood are preferentially sequestered in brain tissue. If that is the case, simply reducing iron won't help. If you reduce iron too low you run the risk of side effects, anemia and so forth.
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    27 Jun '10 12:45
    there are theories about detoxifying the body re MS...

    Here's a link for some natural cures:

    http://www.healingwithnutrition.com/mdisease/multiplesclerosis/multiplesclerosis.html

    Since MS is, of course, profoundly serious, might want to pursue some course of treatment like this under the guidance of a Holistic MD. They are full medical doctors, but with an interest in natural medicine...

    there is always hope.

    while it is not common, there are people who have cured profound and life threatening illness through natural detoxification techniques.
  8. silicon valley
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    29 Jun '10 00:47
    Originally posted by sonhouse
    It presumably isn't that simple or simply reducing iron would have cured MS decades ago. I think it is more likely, if the iron hypothesis is correct, that normal amounts of iron in the patient's blood are preferentially sequestered in brain tissue. If that is the case, simply reducing iron won't help. If you reduce iron too low you run the risk of side effects, anemia and so forth.
    i'd rather anemia for a while than MS, i think.
  9. SubscriberAThousandYoung
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    29 Jun '10 16:03
    Originally posted by sonhouse
    It presumably isn't that simple or simply reducing iron would have cured MS decades ago. I think it is more likely, if the iron hypothesis is correct, that normal amounts of iron in the patient's blood are preferentially sequestered in brain tissue. If that is the case, simply reducing iron won't help. If you reduce iron too low you run the risk of side effects, anemia and so forth.
    According to the OP, the problem is blood drainage from the brain due to hereditarily constricted blood vessels.
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