1. Joined
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    31 Jan '15 04:35
    Yes Hilbert has definitely proven, thru his mathematics that multiple universes truly exist. It's called Hilbert's Space.
  2. Germany
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    31 Jan '15 07:44
    No. A Hilbert space is just a kind of mathematical thingy that has certain properties. It says nothing about the Universe, let alone multiple ones.
  3. Joined
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    31 Jan '15 14:22
    Originally posted by KazetNagorra
    No. A Hilbert space is just a kind of mathematical thingy that has certain properties. It says nothing about the Universe, let alone multiple ones.
    Hilbert space explains the point where universes branch off.. like being on a path..then turning right or turning left.
  4. Joined
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    31 Jan '15 14:39
    Originally posted by woadman
    Hilbert space explains the point where universes branch off.. like being on a path..then turning right or turning left.
    It's a mathematical model.

    You can 'prove' that in any given model certain things could be, or must be true.

    However, unless that model maps to the way reality actually works, that does not
    prove that the model predictions are true in reality.

    That is why all predictions MUST be verified by experimental observation before
    being considered confirmed.

    And even then, discoveries are never confirmed absolutely, only probabilistically.


    So, Unless and until, the multiverse is actually experimentally observed [directly or indirectly]
    it has not been proven to exist at all.
  5. Germany
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    31 Jan '15 15:24
    Originally posted by woadman
    Hilbert space explains the point where universes branch off.. like being on a path..then turning right or turning left.
    The concept of a Hilbert space says absolutely nothing about the Universe.
  6. Joined
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    31 Jan '15 18:44
    Originally posted by KazetNagorra
    The concept of a Hilbert space says absolutely nothing about the Universe.
    I'll have you know that I was watching a science program on TV and some very prominent scientists clearly mentioned Hilbert's Space in regards to multiverses. (splitting off) Anthony Aguirre was one the the guys....
  7. Germany
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    31 Jan '15 18:52
    Originally posted by woadman
    I'll have you know that I was watching a science program on TV and some very prominent scientists clearly mentioned Hilbert's Space in regards to multiverses. (splitting off) Anthony Aguirre was one the the guys....
    A Hilbert space is a very broad concept. It is used in many branches of physics and mathematics. However, it being a mathematical concept, it does not, in and of itself, say anything about the real world.

    In quantum mechanics we consider wave functions as members of the L2 function space, a kind of Hilbert space.
  8. Zugzwang
    Joined
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    31 Jan '15 20:41
    Originally posted by KazetNagorra to Woadman
    The concept of a Hilbert space says absolutely nothing about the Universe.
    Right, mathematical concepts are supposed to be independent of 'physical reality'.
  9. Subscribersonhouse
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    01 Feb '15 01:49
    Originally posted by woadman
    I'll have you know that I was watching a science program on TV and some very prominent scientists clearly mentioned Hilbert's Space in regards to multiverses. (splitting off) Anthony Aguirre was one the the guys....
    It was just a description, no proof of anything. It's like, it COULD happen like this.
  10. Joined
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    01 Feb '15 15:04
    One plus one equals two. See, I have demonstrated and proved mathematically that we have two universes!

    Not!
  11. Joined
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    03 Feb '15 05:07
    Something none of you know::: One of Hilbert's students was none other than Emmanuel Lasker who received his PhD in mathematics at Erlangen Univ.
  12. Subscribersonhouse
    Fast and Curious
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    03 Feb '15 12:26
    Originally posted by woadman
    Something none of you know::: One of Hilbert's students was none other than Emmanuel Lasker who received his PhD in mathematics at Erlangen Univ.
    I knew that AND I have Lasker's grades.
  13. Joined
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    04 Feb '15 22:19
    Every five years or so I re-read 'The Unreasonable Effectiveness of Mathematics in the Natural Sciences,' a brief article by Eugene Wigner. This last time around it reminded me of this thread. I'll quote a chunk of it:

    "We now have, in physics, two theories of great power and interest: the theory of quantum phenomena and the theory of relativity. These two theories have their roots in mutually exclusive groups of phenomena. Relativity theory applies to macroscopic bodies, such as stars. The event of coincidence, that is, in ultimate analysis of collision, is the primitive event in the theory of relativity and defines a point in space-time, or at least would define a point if the colliding particles were infinitely small. Quantum theory has its roots in the microscopic world and, from its point of view, the event of coincidence, or of collision, even if it takes place between particles of no spatial extent, is not primitive and not at all sharply isolated in space-time. The two theories operate with different mathematical concepts: the four dimensional Riemann space and the infinite dimensional Hilbert space, respectively. So far, the two theories could not be united, that is, no mathematical formulation exists to which both of these theories are approximations. All physicists believe that a union of the two theories is inherently possible and that we shall find it. Nevertheless, it is possible also to imagine that no union of the two theories can be found. This example illustrates the two possibilities, of union and of conflict, mentioned before, both of which are conceivable."
  14. Joined
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    05 Feb '15 04:07
    Originally posted by Paul Dirac II
    Every five years or so I re-read 'The Unreasonable Effectiveness of Mathematics in the Natural Sciences,' a brief article by Eugene Wigner. This last time around it reminded me of this thread. I'll quote a chunk of it:

    "We now have, in physics, two theories of great power and interest: the theory of quantum phenomena and the theory of relativity. Th ...[text shortened]... e two possibilities, of union and of conflict, mentioned before, both of which are conceivable."
    So now we wait for Jacob Barnett .....
  15. Joined
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    05 Feb '15 09:36
    Originally posted by Paul Dirac II
    ... These two theories have their roots in mutually exclusive groups of phenomena. ...
    Showing that our knowledge are not yet complete about the theory of relativity and quantum theory.

    Because both of those two theories have grounds in the same universe in coexistance, they cannot exclude one another in reality. Only in our lack of knowledge.
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