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  1. Standard member sonhouse
    Fast and Curious
    07 Aug '17 14:52
    https://phys.org/news/2017-08-synthetic-genomics-unveils-digital-to-biological-digital.html

    This really opens up possibilities, the usual double edges sword.

    You could see for instance, in the far future, an interstellar probe unmanned but the DNA is printed hundreds of years later when it gets to its destination, then working out the cells needed to start reproduction of humanity, where the first gen is born and taught by IA and later generations take over the human part. Just one thought how this can be used.
  2. 08 Aug '17 07:50 / 1 edit
    Originally posted by @sonhouse
    https://phys.org/news/2017-08-synthetic-genomics-unveils-digital-to-biological-digital.html

    This really opens up possibilities, the usual double edges sword.

    You could see for instance, in the far future, an interstellar probe unmanned but the DNA is printed hundreds of years later when it gets to its destination, then working out the cells needed t ...[text shortened]... ght by IA and later generations take over the human part. Just one thought how this can be used.
    Is this the beginning of the life of Earth?
    Just checking...
  3. Standard member sonhouse
    Fast and Curious
    08 Aug '17 20:47
    Originally posted by @fabianfnas
    Is this the beginning of the life of Earth?
    Just checking...
    It takes more than just DNA to make life of course but maybe next there will be a digital to human egg printer too and a digital to sperm printer, THEN we will definitely be in trouble
  4. 08 Aug '17 21:59
    Originally posted by @sonhouse
    https://phys.org/news/2017-08-synthetic-genomics-unveils-digital-to-biological-digital.html

    This really opens up possibilities, the usual double edges sword.

    You could see for instance, in the far future, an interstellar probe unmanned but the DNA is printed hundreds of years later when it gets to its destination, then working out the cells needed t ...[text shortened]... ght by IA and later generations take over the human part. Just one thought how this can be used.
    Wouldn't you also have to transport all of the raw materials (i.e. nucleotides, amino acids, lipids etc.) in order to synthesize the cell in situ? For the application of transporting life forms across the universe, it'd be easier just to transport seeds and (frozen) fertilized eggs, right?
  5. 09 Aug '17 04:31
    Originally posted by @sonhouse
    It takes more than just DNA to make life of course but maybe next there will be a digital to human egg printer too and a digital to sperm printer, THEN we will definitely be in trouble
    If someone wants to invade us here on Earth, that would be a good idea, given necessary time. Is the HIV-virus given us from space, destroying all intelligent life, and growing a full scale ET civilization using HIV as a base? No, I don't think so.

    I was merely thinking on the starting life on Earth, coming from spores from space, deliberately given to us from anyone else?
  6. 09 Aug '17 13:11
    Originally posted by @fabianfnas
    If someone wants to invade us here on Earth, that would be a good idea, given necessary time. Is the HIV-virus given us from space, destroying all intelligent life, and growing a full scale ET civilization using HIV as a base? No, I don't think so.

    I was merely thinking on the starting life on Earth, coming from spores from space, deliberately given to us from anyone else?
    If shielded against solar UV, spores of B. subtilis were capable of surviving in space for up to 6 years, especially if embedded in clay or meteorite powder (artificial meteorites). The data support the likelihood of interplanetary transfer of microorganisms within meteorites, the so-called lithopanspermia hypothesis.


    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2832349/
  7. 09 Aug '17 13:20
    Originally posted by @wildgrass
    If shielded against solar UV, spores of B. subtilis were capable of surviving in space for up to 6 years, especially if embedded in clay or meteorite powder (artificial meteorites). The data support the likelihood of interplanetary transfer of microorganisms within meteorites, the so-called lithopanspermia hypothesis.


    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2832349/
    Do you reference extraterrestrial spores?
  8. 09 Aug '17 15:19
    Originally posted by @fabianfnas
    Do you reference extraterrestrial spores?
    That depends on whether extraterrestrial is simply "outside earth" or "from outside earth".

    There is no evidence to support extraterrestrial origins of life. The referenced review article only highlights the inherent capability of earthly spores and bacteria to survive in space for many years. In fact, some of them thrive in simulated space conditions as long as they are protected from solar radiation. Obviously in order to prove the origins bit, you'd have to demonstrate that where spores came from was not earth. That's a big, perhaps insurmountable hurdle from an evidence standpoint. If we found carbon-based life on Mars right now, how would you go about determining if we seeded it, or if it seeded us? ( If it arose de novo it'd probably be easier to tell). I think lithopanspermia hypotheses are indifferent, and it may be impossible to prove either way.
  9. 09 Aug '17 16:31
    Originally posted by @sonhouse
    https://phys.org/news/2017-08-synthetic-genomics-unveils-digital-to-biological-digital.html

    This really opens up possibilities, the usual double edges sword.

    You could see for instance, in the far future, an interstellar probe unmanned but the DNA is printed hundreds of years later when it gets to its destination, then working out the cells needed t ...[text shortened]... ght by IA and later generations take over the human part. Just one thought how this can be used.
    Yay!

    What could possible go wrong?
  10. 09 Aug '17 19:05
    Originally posted by @wildgrass
    That depends on whether extraterrestrial is simply "outside earth" or "from outside earth".

    There is no evidence to support extraterrestrial origins of life. The referenced review article only highlights the inherent capability of earthly spores and bacteria to survive in space for many years. In fact, some of them thrive in simulated space cond ...[text shortened]... think lithopanspermia hypotheses are indifferent, and it may be impossible to prove either way.
    I'm not into earthly spores. That is no news.

    I refer to the OP. Not seeding other worlds, but others seeding ours. Just speculating, nothing more.
  11. Standard member sonhouse
    Fast and Curious
    09 Aug '17 19:15
    Originally posted by @fabianfnas
    I'm not into earthly spores. That is no news.

    I refer to the OP. Not seeding other worlds, but others seeding ours. Just speculating, nothing more.
    Earth could have seeded other worlds if there was one able to use such seeds, like Mars a couple billion years ago but right now even if there is spoor or bacteria floating around from Earth there is no place in the inner system that would be able to take advantage of such seeds of life.
  12. 09 Aug '17 20:32
    Originally posted by @fabianfnas
    I'm not into earthly spores. That is no news.

    I refer to the OP. Not seeding other worlds, but others seeding ours. Just speculating, nothing more.
    The OP refers to a digital to DNA printer that could "print" a genome in situ, but requires a printer and all the necessary components of life to be transported through space. I was questioning the application of this printer for this purpose, since life can survive in space.

    Also, just speculating, but isn't it interesting that some earthly spores seem very well adapted to space travel? Almost as if they've been there before.
  13. Standard member sonhouse
    Fast and Curious
    11 Aug '17 21:05
    Originally posted by @wildgrass
    The OP refers to a digital to DNA printer that could "print" a genome in situ, but requires a printer and all the necessary components of life to be transported through space. I was questioning the application of this printer for this purpose, since life can survive in space.

    Also, just speculating, but isn't it interesting that some earthly spores seem very well adapted to space travel? Almost as if they've been there before.
    Tartigrades can survive in space in vacuum in high temps totally dried out, comes back to life when put in water and rehydrated.
  14. 11 Aug '17 21:36
    Originally posted by @sonhouse
    Tartigrades can survive in space in vacuum in high temps totally dried out, comes back to life when put in water and rehydrated.
    Holy moly. I have heard about tardigrades before, but I wasn't exactly up to date on their impressive stats. They're basically indestructible.

    ...tardigrades can withstand temperatures down to 1 K (−458 °F; −272 °C) (close to absolute zero) while others can withstand 420 K (300 °F; 150 °C)[12] for several minutes, pressures about six times greater than those found in the deepest ocean trenches, ionizing radiation at doses hundreds of times higher than the lethal dose for a human, and the vacuum of outer space. They can go without food or water for more than 30 years....
  15. Standard member sonhouse
    Fast and Curious
    12 Aug '17 13:02
    Originally posted by @wildgrass
    Holy moly. I have heard about tardigrades before, but I wasn't exactly up to date on their impressive stats. They're basically indestructible.

    ...tardigrades can withstand temperatures down to 1 K (−458 °F; −272 °C) (close to absolute zero) while others can withstand 420 K (300 °F; 150 °C)[12] for several minutes, pressures about six times great ...[text shortened]... the vacuum of outer space. They can go without food or water for more than 30 years....
    Other than that they are pretty vulnerable, eh. I wonder what happens that would allow them to revive from being at one degree Kelvin but not 1/2 degree K or some such. What happens on an atomic or molecular level that changes the rules to actually kill them at say 1/10th degree K, V 1 degree K?