1. Subscribersonhouse
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    28 Aug '12 13:38
    http://phys.org/news/2012-08-advance-near-instantaneous-dna-analysis.html

    This development could put DNA analysis in every country doc's office.
  2. Standard memberThequ1ck
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    28 Aug '12 14:141 edit
    Originally posted by sonhouse
    http://phys.org/news/2012-08-advance-near-instantaneous-dna-analysis.html

    This development could put DNA analysis in every country doc's office.
    That's nothing, I read 'DNA' in about 0.1 of a second!

    The police state is gonna have some fun with this one. I give it a year before
    it's implemented in airports.

    'Beer, the cause of and solution to all of life's problems'
    Homer J Simpson
  3. Wat?
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    28 Aug '12 14:58
    If you can't do the time, don't do the crime. It's simple. Especially for parents! 😀

    -m.
  4. Subscribersonhouse
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    28 Aug '12 15:00
    Originally posted by mikelom
    If you can't do the time, don't do the crime. It's simple. Especially for parents! 😀

    -m.
    And of course we all know, to get the bests genetics, choose the right parents🙂
  5. Cape Town
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    28 Aug '12 15:00
    Originally posted by sonhouse
    http://phys.org/news/2012-08-advance-near-instantaneous-dna-analysis.html

    This development could put DNA analysis in every country doc's office.
    The ready availability of DNA analysis will be a major revolution. It will affect us in ways we haven't yet dreamed about, but some of the things I can think of are:
    1. As mentioned in the article, the ability to identify diseases quickly and accurately.
    2. The ability to identify genetic diseases and susceptibilities.
    3. Far greater knowledge of the micro-organisms on our bodies and their benefits and detriments.
    4. Far quicker and easier identification and classification of species.
    5. It may even have major social implications for example it will become quite easy for a father to check whether his children are really his.
  6. Cape Town
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    28 Aug '12 16:13
    Originally posted by sonhouse
    And of course we all know, to get the bests genetics, choose the right parents🙂
    For all future spouses I think I should do a DNA test first. The question is whether or not our knowledge of DNA is good enough yet to actually decide what is good DNA for our children and what is not. And do we do compatibility tests with our own DNA?
  7. Standard memberThequ1ck
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    28 Aug '12 18:102 edits
    Originally posted by twhitehead
    The ready availability of DNA analysis will be a major revolution. It will affect us in ways we haven't yet dreamed about, but some of the things I can think of are:
    1. As mentioned in the article, the ability to identify diseases quickly and accurately.
    2. The ability to identify genetic diseases and susceptibilities.
    3. Far greater knowledge of the m ...[text shortened]... or example it will become quite easy for a father to check whether his children are really his.
    Point 3, I'd like to pick up on.

    Another emerging field due to the spin-off tech's from the Human Genome is metagenomics
    (the study of soil and sea samples (although, not limited to)).

    The bottleneck at the moment is disseminating the information fast
    enough to match the speed at which we're bringing it in

    It's not the size of the data itself but the processing power required to unravel it
    and categories/analyse it.
    For example, did you know that you can fit the information to store
    35 peoples entire DNA sequences onto a standard CD?!
  8. Subscribersonhouse
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    28 Aug '12 18:32
    Originally posted by Thequ1ck
    Point 3, I'd like to pick up on.

    Another emerging field due to the spin-off tech's from the Human Genome is metagenomics
    (the study of soil and sea samples (although, not limited to)).

    The bottleneck at the moment is disseminating the information fast
    enough to match the speed at which we're bringing it in

    It's not the size of the data itself but ...[text shortened]... t you can fit the information to store
    35 peoples entire DNA sequences onto a standard CD?!
    20 megs per person?
  9. Standard memberThequ1ck
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    28 Aug '12 19:051 edit
    Originally posted by sonhouse
    20 megs per person?
    Yep
    http://www.genetic-future.com/2008/06/how-much-data-is-human-genome-it.html
  10. Standard memberThequ1ck
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    28 Aug '12 21:231 edit
    Actually, my previous post was misleading, sorry. This is only information about the
    coding sequences.

    To store the entire genome is about 2-30 Terabytes (according to the article).

    Personally, I think junk DNA is much more of interest.
  11. Subscribersonhouse
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    29 Aug '12 02:151 edit
    Originally posted by Thequ1ck
    Actually, my previous post was misleading, sorry. This is only information about the
    coding sequences.

    To store the entire genome is about 2-30 Terabytes (according to the article).

    Personally, I think junk DNA is much more of interest.
    I don't think they even call it junk DNA anymore, I think they are called codons now, something like that.

    Maybe not, here is a WIKI about junk dna:

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Noncoding_DNA
  12. Standard memberThequ1ck
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    29 Aug '12 08:24
    Originally posted by sonhouse
    I don't think they even call it junk DNA anymore, I think they are called codons now, something like that.

    Maybe not, here is a WIKI about junk dna:

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Noncoding_DNA
    Junk DNA is particularly telling of our ancestry as it contains information about our
    past. Genes which fulfilled their purpose and were eventually switched off and left
    to decay over time.

    It's the ghost in the machine. It's the left-over bits when you've fixed the VCR.

    There is a wealth of history stored in our junk DNA about our past and the genes
    that used to be important for our survival.
  13. Subscribersonhouse
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    29 Aug '12 11:20
    Originally posted by Thequ1ck
    Junk DNA is particularly telling of our ancestry as it contains information about our
    past. Genes which fulfilled their purpose and were eventually switched off and left
    to decay over time.

    It's the ghost in the machine. It's the left-over bits when you've fixed the VCR.

    There is a wealth of history stored in our junk DNA about our past and the genes
    that used to be important for our survival.
    Those same genes might be repository of survival techniques like reaction to cold or heat or other environmental stresses. They may activate when the person is confronted by some unusual condition.
  14. Standard memberThequ1ck
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    29 Aug '12 14:283 edits
    Originally posted by sonhouse
    Those same genes might be repository of survival techniques like reaction to cold or heat or other environmental stresses. They may activate when the person is confronted by some unusual condition.
    Precisely. Although the Intron sequences themselves lack the necessary codons to
    for transcription. They do contain binding elements which can play an important
    role in DNA expression.

    When the Human genome project was complete it came as a surprise how fewer genes
    there were compared to expectations. The reason is that many genes are recombinant.
    (It's precisely what it sounds like, mis-matching gene sequences together to provide combinations)
    This is especially true in the immune system which gives rise to our ability to
    resist so many types of disease.

    It is a myth, for example, that if an Alien came to earth we could be infected with Alien viruses
    and/or bacteria. Alien viruses capable of attacking our immune systems would
    stand the same or even less advantage than the pathogens we already have on
    earth, even if they were designed to utilize our cellular apparatus.

    'The most common type of intron is called a spliceosomal or nuclear intron; the name comes from the cellular machinery, known as the spliceosome, which is responsible for splicing and making sure that the genetic sequences in introns are not translated into junk proteins. This type of intron is the one found in the nuclear genes of humans........

    There are also cases in which introns contain genes for small nuclear RNA, which is important for the translation of messenger RNA, an intermediary between DNA and proteins. Nuclear introns can also be important in a process called alternative splicing, which can produce multiple types of messenger RNA from a single gene. Although these examples demonstrate a constructive role for introns, they cannot explain why introns are so ubiquitous in our genes..'

    http://www.scientificamerican.com/article.cfm?id=what-is-known-about-the-f

    It has been shown that the IME (intron-mediated enhancement) is particularly
    sensitive to changes in the concentration of nucleotides.

    'Not all introns enhance gene expression, but those that do typically enhance expression between 2– and 10–fold relative to an intronless control.'
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Intron-mediated_enhancement

    'The sequences of the enhancing UBQ10 intron and the non-enhancing COR15a intron were modified to create large alterations in IMEter score via minimal nucleotide changes.'

    http://nar.oxfordjournals.org/content/early/2011/03/22/nar.gkr043.long

    So changes such as diet or sunlight can alter the production of some nucleotides
    and thereby influence protein synthesis by moderating Intron Mediated Enhancement.
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