Please turn on javascript in your browser to play chess.
Science Forum

Science Forum

  1. Standard member sonhouse
    Fast and Curious
    17 Sep '13 07:59 / 1 edit
    http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/ap130917.html

    This photo shows thousands of galaxies clustered together and making gravitational lensing of galaxies way behind this cluster. All the images in this shot are galaxies, not stars, except for the 4 with the spikes which are local stars in our own galaxy. The rest are all galaxies!
  2. 17 Sep '13 08:05
    Originally posted by sonhouse
    http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/ap130917.html.

    This photo shows thousands of galaxies clustered together and making gravitational lensing of galaxies way behind this cluster. All the images in this shot are galaxies, not stars, except for the 4 with the spikes which are local stars in our own galaxy. The rest are all galaxies!
    The link doesn't work for me. All I get is a:

    "Not Found

    The requested URL /apod/ap130917.html. was not found on this server."

    error message.
  3. Standard member sonhouse
    Fast and Curious
    17 Sep '13 08:08
    Originally posted by humy
    The link doesn't work for me. All I get is a:

    "Not Found

    The requested URL /apod/ap130917.html. was not found on this server."

    error message.
    Thanks, it's fixed now. The period tacked after html was doing it in. It works now.
  4. Standard member woodypusher
    misanthrope
    17 Sep '13 09:11
    I watched a documentary on Einstein awhile back. Fascinating. He wanted to prove gravity was really the curvature of space/time and had to find a way to prove it. Space, he theorized, was a 'fabric' which was bent by the objects in it. The larger objects would warp the space arounfd it and smaller objects would orbit it because they got trapped in this curvature. But how to prove this? He then realized that by ingeniously using our own sun during a solar eclipse, light from behind the sun would appear to bend. This went against his hero Isaac Newton's theory that gravity was a force that pulled us down. Most everyone scoffed at this radical new idea of Einstein's except a guy named Eddington. Eddington believed in Einstein and agreed to photograph a solar eclipse and take measurements. Obstacles such as weather and war stalled Eddington's works but he finally found a good spot to photograph a solar eclipse eventually. Eddington was able to prove Einstein's theory of General Relativity. Oddly enough, Einstein didn't win the Nobel Prize for this but did earlier for his "Special Theory of Relativity" where he showed light was made of photons, and not beams. He gave the money from that prize to his wife so that she would allow them to divorce, freein him to marry his cousin.

    Some of this might be a little off but this is my best recollection.

    Einstein later said that his help in creating the Atomic Bomb was "single greatest mistake" of his life.
  5. Standard member sonhouse
    Fast and Curious
    17 Sep '13 10:31
    Originally posted by woodypusher
    I watched a documentary on Einstein awhile back. Fascinating. He wanted to prove gravity was really the curvature of space/time and had to find a way to prove it. Space, he theorized, was a 'fabric' which was bent by the objects in it. The larger objects would warp the space arounfd it and smaller objects would orbit it because they got trapped in this c ...[text shortened]... that his help in creating the Atomic Bomb was "single greatest mistake" of his life.
    And Eddington almost didn't complete the experiment, having all kinds of difficulties mainly with the weather. If it is cloudy you don't do astronomy. But he came through at the last minute for those famous photo's showing the stars to have moved because of the gravity of the Sun. Too bad Eddington was destined for obscurity.
  6. Standard member RJHinds
    The Near Genius
    18 Sep '13 06:04
    Originally posted by woodypusher
    I watched a documentary on Einstein awhile back. Fascinating. He wanted to prove gravity was really the curvature of space/time and had to find a way to prove it. Space, he theorized, was a 'fabric' which was bent by the objects in it. The larger objects would warp the space arounfd it and smaller objects would orbit it because they got trapped in this c ...[text shortened]... that his help in creating the Atomic Bomb was "single greatest mistake" of his life.
    The idea that space was like a fabric is not new, because it was theorized in the Holy Bible thousands of years before Einstein. Perhaps that is where Einstein came up with it for his version.

    The Instructor
  7. 18 Sep '13 07:46
    Originally posted by RJHinds
    The idea that space was like a fabric is not new, because it was theorized in the Holy Bible thousands of years before Einstein. Perhaps that is where Einstein came up with it for his version.

    The Instructor
    The idea that space was like a fabric is not new

    -and the idea that it could be bent by the gravity of nearby objects was new. Sorry! The Bible didn't explain this nor relativity! Try again.
  8. Standard member sonhouse
    Fast and Curious
    18 Sep '13 10:19
    Originally posted by RJHinds
    The idea that space was like a fabric is not new, because it was theorized in the Holy Bible thousands of years before Einstein. Perhaps that is where Einstein came up with it for his version.

    The Instructor
    It's funny you don't remember objecting to the idea that space is malleable due to the presence of mass. You objected to that and any change in the flow of time. I guess your obsession with religion has clouded your mind to all that furor you engendered on that subject several years ago.