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Science Forum

  1. 14 May '15 19:23
    http://physicsworld.com/cws/article/news/2015/may/14/electron-pairing-without-superconductivity-seen-at-long-last

    I am slightly surprised the link doesn't refer to those paired electrons as Cooper pairs. Aren't those paired electrons technically still called Cooper pairs despite not always existing with superconductivity?

    I tried googling "cooper pairs without superconductivity" but got nowhere.
  2. Standard member sonhouse
    Fast and Curious
    23 May '15 19:24 / 2 edits
    Originally posted by humy
    http://physicsworld.com/cws/article/news/2015/may/14/electron-pairing-without-superconductivity-seen-at-long-last

    I am slightly surprised the link doesn't refer to those paired electrons as Cooper pairs. Aren't those paired electrons technically still called Cooper pairs despite not always existing with superconductivity?

    I tried googling "cooper pairs without superconductivity" but got nowhere.
    The effect might be due to something else besides cooper pairing. Have no idea what that could be but just sayin...

    I see in the article the effect isn't seen till a 30,000 Gauss magnetic field is applied. That is a huge field so there could be some kind of magnetic coupling going on. You know how electrons behave in magnetic fields, if the electron energy is low enough, a sufficiently high field strength magnetic field can make the electrons go in circles.

    The last sentence says the effect has not been proven to be cooper pairs.