1. Subscribersonhouse
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    11 Apr '12 16:53
    http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/04/090428092823.htm

    Evidence showing bones a half million years younger than the big one 65 million years ago. (Whether it was the asteroid that offed most of them or climate change or both, they mostly didn't survive. Yet their descendants are here, birds, so SOME of them had to have survived the big offing back then)

    It doesn't seem a stretch to me for isolated pockets of dino's to have survived even a million years after the KT event.
  2. Subscriberjoe shmo
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    11 Apr '12 19:27
    Originally posted by sonhouse
    http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/04/090428092823.htm

    Evidence showing bones a half million years younger than the big one 65 million years ago. (Whether it was the asteroid that offed most of them or climate change or both, they mostly didn't survive. Yet their descendants are here, birds, so SOME of them had to have survived the big offing back ...[text shortened]... o me for isolated pockets of dino's to have survived even a million years after the KT event.
    Isn't the fact that their are birds on the planet, evidence that some dinosaurs survived...or did the change the bird/Dino Hypothesis while I wasn't looking?
  3. Subscribersonhouse
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    11 Apr '12 20:201 edit
    Originally posted by joe shmo
    Isn't the fact that their are birds on the planet, evidence that some dinosaurs survived...or did the change the bird/Dino Hypothesis while I wasn't looking?
    You didn't read my post? " Their descendants are here, birds, so SOME of them must have survived."
  4. Subscriberjoe shmo
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    11 Apr '12 21:24
    Originally posted by sonhouse
    You didn't read my post? " Their descendants are here, birds, so SOME of them must have survived."
    Woops, just read the title...sorry.

    😞
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    11 Apr '12 22:251 edit
    Originally posted by sonhouse
    It doesn't seem a stretch to me for isolated pockets of dino's to have survived even a million years after the KT event.
    Surely we've already known this for several decades or so? The extinction wasn't nearly as abrupt as we thought it was in the 60s, but evidence for that has been coming in since at least when I was in school.

    Richard
  6. Subscribersonhouse
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    12 Apr '12 19:59
    Originally posted by Shallow Blue
    Surely we've already known this for several decades or so? The extinction wasn't nearly as abrupt as we thought it was in the 60s, but evidence for that has been coming in since at least when I was in school.

    Richard
    It now appears the chixulub meterorite/asteroid was just the coup de grace for the dino's. They had been under severe stress from the environment, volcanic activity, etc., for a couple million years before that. The ones that survived to become birds and such now must have been small to begin with so they could seek shelter easier.
  7. Cape Town
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    13 Apr '12 08:01
    Originally posted by sonhouse
    It now appears the chixulub meterorite/asteroid was just the coup de grace for the dino's. They had been under severe stress from the environment, volcanic activity, etc., for a couple million years before that. The ones that survived to become birds and such now must have been small to begin with so they could seek shelter easier.
    I heard somewhere that one possible factor was acid rain which destroys egg shells. So it is possible that the birds ancestor incubated its eggs by sitting on them and thus protected them from the rain.
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