Please turn on javascript in your browser to play chess.
Science Forum

Science Forum

  1. Standard member sonhouse
    Fast and Curious
    21 Jul '17 11:15
    https://phys.org/news/2017-07-scientists-gravitational-anomaly-earth_1.html

    Me no comprendo. what do they mean by gravitational anomaly anyway?
  2. 21 Jul '17 11:57
    I think it is a case of a journalist trying to dumb it down for the layman and failing (possibly because said journalist didn't understand it either).

    Enjoy:
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gravitational_anomaly


    Original nature article (not free to see more than the summary)
    http://www.nature.com/nature/journal/v547/n7663/full/nature23005.html?foxtrotcallback=true
  3. Standard member sonhouse
    Fast and Curious
    21 Jul '17 12:11
    Originally posted by @twhitehead
    I think it is a case of a journalist trying to dumb it down for the layman and failing (possibly because said journalist didn't understand it either).

    Enjoy:
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gravitational_anomaly


    Original nature article (not free to see more than the summary)
    http://www.nature.com/nature/journal/v547/n7663/full/nature23005.html?foxtrotcallback=true
    Is this 'anomaly' something that relates to sci fi stuff like anti-gravity? What is the practical use of such?
  4. 21 Jul '17 13:01 / 1 edit
    Originally posted by @sonhouse
    Is this 'anomaly' something that relates to sci fi stuff like anti-gravity?
    No, I don't think so.

    What is the practical use of such?
    They seem to suggest it has uses in the semi conductor industry, but far more importantly for us, it provides a test of quantum theories of gravity and general relativity. If confirmed it provides either confirmation or contradiction to particular theories in fundamental physics.
    But it requires specialist knowledge (that I lack) to know exactly what its all about.
  5. Standard member sonhouse
    Fast and Curious
    21 Jul '17 13:26
    Originally posted by @twhitehead
    No, I don't think so.

    [b]What is the practical use of such?

    They seem to suggest it has uses in the semi conductor industry, but far more importantly for us, it provides a test of quantum theories of gravity and general relativity. If confirmed it provides either confirmation or contradiction to particular theories in fundamental physics.
    But it requires specialist knowledge (that I lack) to know exactly what its all about.[/b]
    I wonder what the connection would be to more sensitive sensors they alluded to? I guess it's one of those fundamental discoveries where nobody knows what it will lead to.