Please turn on javascript in your browser to play chess.
Science Forum

Science Forum

  1. 09 Feb '16 01:07
    http://www.techinsider.io/gravitational-wave-nature-ligo-february-11-2016-2

    If true, should this win a Nobel?
  2. 09 Feb '16 03:19
    Originally posted by whodey
    http://www.techinsider.io/gravitational-wave-nature-ligo-february-11-2016-2

    If true, should this win a Nobel?
    Why does it have to be true for a Nobel?
  3. Standard member DeepThought
    Losing the Thread
    09 Feb '16 20:32
    Originally posted by joe beyser
    Why does it have to be true for a Nobel?
    I can invent any number of untrue theories, none of them will help the world terribly. The purpose of science is to explain the world. If the theory, or experiment (I haven't followed the link in the OP yet), improves our understanding of the world and increases our power over nature then it is deserving. To do that it has to be true, within the criteria science sets for itself for truth which is generally along the lines of "a better approximation than the last one.".
  4. Standard member DeepThought
    Losing the Thread
    09 Feb '16 20:39
    I've read the article now. If this is what has happened it is, if anything, more important than the confirmation of the existence of the Higgs Boson. It puts most Physics Nobel prizes to shame.

    The "if true" part is whether the speculation of the journalists is true, not the actual detection.
  5. Standard member sonhouse
    Fast and Curious
    09 Feb '16 20:54 / 3 edits
    Originally posted by DeepThought
    I've read the article now. If this is what has happened it is, if anything, more important than the confirmation of the existence of the Higgs Boson. It puts most Physics Nobel prizes to shame.

    The "if true" part is whether the speculation of the journalists is true, not the actual detection.
    There is also another controversy up in the air right now. GR Vs G4V. There is an alternate version of gravity by C. Mead, a professor at Caltech, one of his claims to fame is ."Moore's law'. Anyway, here is his theory and the gravity guys at LIGO are in tune with it:

    YouTube

    I think you all should watch this video

    Man, that was a fast hour!
  6. 11 Feb '16 15:59 / 1 edit
    So, they've been detected.

    A nice explanation for the general public such as myself: http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/science/12150944/Gravitational-waves-Einstein-was-right-and-this-announcement-is-the-scientific-highlight-of-the-decade.html
  7. 11 Feb '16 16:33 / 3 edits
    http://physicsworld.com/cws/article/news/2016/feb/11/ligo-detects-first-ever-gravitational-waves-from-two-merging-black-holes

    Not only did the conclusively detect gravity waves, they detected them traveling at the speed of light which clearly implies gravity travels as the speed of light.
  8. Subscriber moonbus
    Uber-Nerd
    11 Feb '16 16:53
    Why it matters:

    http://www.bbc.com/news/science-environment-35524440

    interview with Hawking.
  9. Standard member sonhouse
    Fast and Curious
    11 Feb '16 17:03
    Originally posted by humy
    http://physicsworld.com/cws/article/news/2016/feb/11/ligo-detects-first-ever-gravitational-waves-from-two-merging-black-holes

    Not only did the conclusively detect gravity waves, they detected them traveling at the speed of light which clearly implies gravity travels as the speed of light.
    http://phys.org/news/2016-02-gravitational-years-einstein.html

    7 millisecond difference between signals, says it is in the southern hemisphere.
  10. 11 Feb '16 19:35
    And in case anyone was wondering what was detected in the waves:
    http://xkcd.com/1642/
  11. 11 Feb '16 19:42
    From the article:
    About three times the mass of the sun was converted into gravitational waves in a fraction of a second—with a peak power output about 50 times that of the whole visible universe.

    Could dark energy be in gravitational waves?
  12. Standard member sonhouse
    Fast and Curious
    11 Feb '16 19:43
    Originally posted by twhitehead
    And in case anyone was wondering what was detected in the waves:
    http://xkcd.com/1642/
    Hehe, good one It does bring up a question, would it take a god to modulate a gravity wave that could be detected and demodulated on Earth so actual information could be send via gravity waves?