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Science Forum

  1. Standard member sonhouse
    Fast and Curious
    27 Oct '16 17:39
    http://phys.org/news/2016-10-early-universe-today.html

    This is something new. The simulations suggest shocks of radiation from very early in BB history, 10^-30 seconds after BB to about 1/10 of a millisecond, radiation from that time could form shock waves strong enough to generate gravity waves but would be stretched out in time to what I calculated to be a wavefront taking 3800 years to complete. They claim they could detect that long a wavelength, a wavelength of 3800 light years. Only about 40 or so waves would go by in the entire milky way galaxy or be in the whole galaxy at the same time.
    Don't know how they think they would manage to detect such waves, since the ones they detected was about 100 hertz.
  2. 27 Oct '16 18:51
    Originally posted by sonhouse
    to what I calculated to be a wavefront taking 3800 years to complete.
    What do you mean by complete?
  3. Standard member apathist
    looking for loot
    28 Oct '16 09:55
    Physicists play with math, and draw suggestions. I appreciate they look up from their tables now and then to see if reality complies.
  4. Standard member sonhouse
    Fast and Curious
    28 Oct '16 10:12
    Originally posted by twhitehead
    What do you mean by complete?
    To complete one cycle, except I overdid it a bit a cycle takes 3800 DAYS not years. So a bit over 10 years per cycle, that makes it a bit easier to see a complete cycle.

    They said the frequency was 3 Nano hertz if I read it right, 333 million seconds divide by 86400 is about 3800 days.