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Science Forum

  1. Standard member Thequ1ck
    Fast above
    01 Jul '11 10:39
    Hiccups are triggered by electric signals
    generated in the brain stem. Amphibian brain stems emit similar
    signals, which control the regular motion of their gills. Our brain
    stems, inherited from amphibian ancestors, still spurt out odd signals
    producing hiccups that are, according to Shubin, essentially the same
    phenomenon as gill breathing.

    This is atavism, or evolutionary throwback activity, at work. Luckily, you do eventually stop trying to breathe through your gills when it dawns on your brain that you are actually a modern human, not a prehistoric fish.

    So perhaps the next time you are hit with a serious bout of the hiccups, instead of drinking a shot of vinegar, concentrate on your humanity. Just read some Descartes, or Harold Bloom's Shakespeare opus, The Invention of the Human, and you'll be breathing like a person in no time.

    http://bio.info.rmati.ca/fr/node/920
  2. 02 Jul '11 09:37
    Originally posted by Thequ1ck
    This is atavism, or evolutionary throwback activity, at work. Luckily, you do eventually stop trying to breathe through your gills when it dawns on your brain that you are actually a modern human, not a prehistoric fish.

    So perhaps the next time you are hit with a serious bout of the hiccups, instead of drinking a shot of vinegar, concentrate on your hum ...[text shortened]... hakespeare opus, The Invention of the Human, and you'll be breathing like a person in no time.
    Many of our functions can be described as 'evolutionary throwbacks' yet they are still useful and functional to us. One could say our arms are 'evolutionary throwbacks' of fins.
    Hiccups serve a purpose in humans (and other animals) and this really has nothing whatsoever to do with gills or our brain thinking we have gills.
  3. Subscriber karoly aczel
    Happy Chappy
    02 Jul '11 23:14
    Drink water upside down. Hardly ever fails
  4. Standard member sonhouse
    Fast and Curious
    03 Jul '11 11:48
    Originally posted by Thequ1ck
    Hiccups are triggered by electric signals
    generated in the brain stem. Amphibian brain stems emit similar
    signals, which control the regular motion of their gills. Our brain
    stems, inherited from amphibian ancestors, still spurt out odd signals
    producing hiccups that are, according to Shubin, essentially the same
    phenomenon as gill breathing.

    This i ...[text shortened]... man, and you'll be breathing like a person in no time.

    http://bio.info.rmati.ca/fr/node/920
    Anything that requires some time, since time is usually the main factor in losing the hiccups. You could just as well stare at the stars for an hour or look at bugs in a microscope or go roller skating. They would all pretty much have the same result.
  5. Subscriber AThousandYoung
    Do ya think?
    04 Jul '11 09:05
    tablespoon of sugar
  6. Standard member Thequ1ck
    Fast above
    04 Jul '11 12:26
    Originally posted by sonhouse
    Anything that requires some time, since time is usually the main factor in losing the hiccups. You could just as well stare at the stars for an hour or look at bugs in a microscope or go roller skating. They would all pretty much have the same result.
    But don't feed the fish.
  7. Subscriber AThousandYoung
    Do ya think?
    05 Jul '11 20:02
    Halloween hiccups

    http://www.homestarrunner.com/ween04.html