1. Joined
    06 Mar '12
    Moves
    625
    19 Dec '14 16:508 edits
    This looks like valid research but cannot help ask is this result just a bit TOO good to be true?

    http://medicalxpress.com/news/2014-12-ibuprofen-anti-aging-medicine-popular-over-the.html
    "...Ibuprofen, a common over-the-counter drug used to relieve pain and fever, could hold the keys to a longer healthier life, according to a study by researchers at the Buck Institute for Research on Aging. Publishing in PLoS Genetics on December 18th, scientists showed that regular doses of ibuprofen extended the lifespan of yeast, worms and fruit flies.

    "There is a lot to be excited about," said Brian Kennedy, PhD, CEO of the Buck Institute, who said treatments, given at doses comparable to those used in humans, extended lifespan an average of 15 percent in the model organisms. "Not only did all the species live longer, but the treated flies and worms appeared more healthy," he said. "The research shows that ibuprofen impacts a process not yet implicated in aging, giving us a new way to study and understand the aging process." But most importantly, Kennedy said the study opens the door for a new exploration of so-called "anti-aging medicines." "Ibuprofen is a relatively safe drug, found in most people's medicine cabinets," he said. "There is every reason to believe there are other existing treatments that can impact healthspan and we need to be studying them."

    The work was the result of a collaboration between the Buck Institute and Texas A & M's Agrilife program. Michael Polymenis, PhD, an AgriLife Research biochemist started the work in baker's yeast and then moved it into worms and flies. Polymenis, who also is a professor in the biochemistry and biophysics department at Texas A&M University, said the three-year project showed that ibuprofen interferes with the ability of yeast cells to pick up tryptophan, an amino acid found in every cell of every organism. Tryptophan is essential for humans, who get it from protein sources in the diet. "We are not sure why this works, but it's worth exploring further. This study was a proof of principle, to show that common, relatively safe drugs in humans can extend the lifespan of very diverse organisms," he said. "Therefore, it should be possible to find others like ibuprofen with even better ability to extend lifespan, with the aim of adding healthy years of life in people."

    "Dr. Polymenis approached me with this idea of seeing how his cell cycle analysis corresponded with our aging studies," said Kennedy. "He had identified some drugs that had some really unique properties, and we wanted to know if they might affect aging, so we did those studies in our lab," he said. "The Buck Institute is interested in finding out why people get sick when they get old. We think that by understanding those processes, we can intervene and find ways to extend human healthspan to keep people healthier longer to slow down aging. That's our ultimate goal."
    Ibuprofen is in the class of compounds known as NSAID's - nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs used for relieving pain, helping with fever and reducing inflammation. It was created in the early 1960's in England and was first made available by prescription and then, after widespread use, became available over-the-counter throughout the world in the 1980s. The World Health Organization includes ibuprofen on their "List of Essential Medications" needed in a basic health system. Although deemed relatively safe and commonly used, ibuprofen can have adverse side effects, particularly in the gastrointestinal tract and the liver at high doses.

    Chong He, PhD, a postdoctoral fellow at the Buck Institute and lead author on the paper, said the extended lifespan in the model organisms would be the equivalent to another dozen or so years of healthy living in humans. "Our preliminary data in the worms showed that ibuprofen also extended their healthspan," she said. "Healthy worms tend to thrash a lot and the treated worms thrashed much longer than would be normally expected. As they aged, they also swallowed food much faster than expected."

    ..."

    What? just by taking this relatively safe drug, I may live for another extra "dozen or so years of healthy living"!!! I really hope this is valid research and it translates that way. But not sure I would risk taking Ibuprofen just yet until I know for sure I wouldn't be just wasting my money or, much MUCH worse, actually shortening my life!
    I will definitely be taking a constant close eye on this line of research for now on! If and when there is definite and sound conformation that this translates to humans, I will start taking it -but not until then. I want to see the irrefutable evidence first.
  2. Subscribersonhouse
    Fast and Curious
    slatington, pa, usa
    Joined
    28 Dec '04
    Moves
    52619
    19 Dec '14 18:11
    Originally posted by humy
    This looks like valid research but cannot help ask is this result just a bit TOO good to be true?

    http://medicalxpress.com/news/2014-12-ibuprofen-anti-aging-medicine-popular-over-the.html
    "...Ibuprofen, a common over-the-counter drug used to relieve pain and fever, could hold the keys to a longer healthier life, according to a study by researchers at the Bu ...[text shortened]... umans, I will start taking it -but not until then. I want to see the irrefutable evidence first.
    So I am going to live to be 140? wow.

    One thing about Ibuprofen though, it is hard on the kidneys. My creatinine levels went up when I was taking it a lot. I was clearly overdoing it though. Now I only take two of the 200 mg when I need it. I wonder if it is one of those things like the low dose aspirin regimen I hear about for the heart?
  3. Joined
    06 Mar '12
    Moves
    625
    19 Dec '14 20:047 edits
    Originally posted by sonhouse
    So I am going to live to be 140? wow.

    One thing about Ibuprofen though, it is hard on the kidneys. My creatinine levels went up when I was taking it a lot. I was clearly overdoing it though. Now I only take two of the 200 mg when I need it. I wonder if it is one of those things like the low dose aspirin regimen I hear about for the heart?
    I wonder if it is one of those things like the low dose aspirin regimen I hear about for the heart?

    oh no, that is a scientific myth! I did some internet research on it and aspirin does nothing for reducing the risk of cardiovascular disease!
    All the research that says it does is scientifically flawed!
    The same goes for the myth that small amounts of aspirin reduces the risk of diabetes.

    However, there is real evidence that small doses of aspirin reduces the risk of cancer! -which is why I take small doses (half an aspirin cautiously spread over each day ).

    However, even then, and especially if you are old, you should take small doses with caution for even low doses slightly increase the risk of deadly intestinal bleeding and even strokes! If you get any sign or symptom that could indicate a risk of stroke, like a headache, or any sign of intestinal blooding, or any stomach ache or any sign of kidney infection, you must completely stop taking aspirin until you are certain the symptoms have completely gone away.

    Incidentally, the very common practice of taking aspirin for colds and flue is a very bad idea for there is good scientific evidence that it has the effect of prolonging such illnesses by stopping fever -the very thing the immune system must often give you to fight of the disease! the same goes for paracetamol.
    I used to take paracetamol whenever I got a cold and wondered why it seemed to take over two agonizing weeks to get over it. Then when I heard of the research that explained why and then I got a cold, I tried taking no aspirin or paracetamol. What happened next is that I got a fever which made my just a little uncomfortable but it was worth it because I got over the cold over just one night! The next day I felt just fine. I later got cold several more times and did the same thing and always recovered fast from the cold after each fever. So I know from direct personal experience that aspirin or paracetamol definitely prolongs colds. Now, every time I get a cold, I hope I get a fever -because when I get a fever, I know I won't have to put up with the cold for much longer! i know I just have to put up with one only slightly rough night, but then its all over and done with.
  4. Subscribersonhouse
    Fast and Curious
    slatington, pa, usa
    Joined
    28 Dec '04
    Moves
    52619
    20 Dec '14 21:31
    Originally posted by humy
    I wonder if it is one of those things like the low dose aspirin regimen I hear about for the heart?

    oh no, that is a scientific myth! I did some internet research on it and aspirin does nothing for reducing the risk of cardiovascular disease!
    All the research that says it does is scientifically flawed!
    The same goes for the myth that s ...[text shortened]... w I just have to put up with one only slightly rough night, but then its all over and done with.
    All I take for colds is vitamin C and D. And those zinc lozenges, seems to hasten recovery. But is there anything in that study about the dose of Ibu?
  5. Joined
    06 Mar '12
    Moves
    625
    20 Dec '14 22:254 edits
    Originally posted by sonhouse
    But is there anything in that study about the dose of Ibu?
    I have tried to get some info on the kind of dose needed for that theoretical anti-aging effect but had no luck.

    I wondered if, despite the huge uncertainties here, would it be worth me taking the risk of taking cautiously relatively low doses but over an indefinite period of time for what I hope would be a modest anti-aging effect but without too much risk? To better judge this, I need to know more about the risks of taking it long term so a tried to look up research on this but didn't get very far. But the general message seems to be that, for most people, there is probability only significant long term risk if you keep taking it at relatively high doses and, among its dangers, it can damage the kidneys although that doesn't happen for most people taking it. So would it be worth me (or you ) taking it at relatively low doses (like I do with aspirin because of the known long term risks of taking aspirin in large doses ) for hopefully some modest anti-aging effect? I really am not sure. Perhaps, just like with the way I take aspirin, for now and until we have more research, one should very cautiously taking only half a tablet each day and, even then, cautiously spread that half a tablet over the day and, even then, very cautiously temporally stop taking it each time one get any symptoms that might indicate a start of a problem?

    I have found several links on research on the safety of Ibu that intially sound quite alarming (example: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/health/article-1346254/Ibuprofen-trebles-risk-stroke-doctors-warn.html ) But, when you read them through carefully, they usually say those alarming risks only occur for people that take it long term at HIGH doses. So, the question is, what about the risks of taking it at LOW doses long term? Do the vast bulk of those risks evaporate below a certain dosage which we can call a 'safe' dose or do the risks vary roughly linearly with dose so there isn't such thing as a 'safe' dose? I think this is the critical question we need to answer.
  6. Subscribersonhouse
    Fast and Curious
    slatington, pa, usa
    Joined
    28 Dec '04
    Moves
    52619
    20 Dec '14 22:58
    Originally posted by humy
    I have tried to get some info on the kind of dose needed for that theoretical anti-aging effect but had no luck.

    I wondered if, despite the huge uncertainties here, would it be worth me taking the risk of taking cautiously relatively low doses but over an indefinite period of time for what I hope would be a modest anti-aging effect but without too muc ...[text shortened]... here isn't such thing as a 'safe' dose? I think this is the critical question we need to answer.
    I know high doses screwed up my kidneys but they recovered after I stopped that.
  7. Joined
    06 Mar '12
    Moves
    625
    23 Dec '14 18:172 edits
    http://medicalxpress.com/news/2014-12-molecular-mechanism-health-benefits-dietary.html
    "...A new study led by Harvard School of Public Health (HSPH) researchers identifies a key molecular mechanism behind the health benefits of dietary restriction, or reduced food intake without malnutrition. Also known as calorie restriction, dietary restriction is best known for its ability to slow aging in laboratory animals. The findings here show that restricting two amino acids, methionine and cysteine, results in increased hydrogen sulfide (H2S) production and protection against ischemia reperfusion injury, damage to tissue that occurs following the interruption of blood flow as during organ transplantation and stroke. Increased H2S production upon dietary restriction was also associated with lifespan extension in worms, flies, and yeast...."

    This is yet another bit of research that, like the OP one, indicates that reducing absorption/intake of some specific amino acids may slow down aging although, in this case, both how the anti-aging process works and the relevant amino acids are assumed to be different.
    Perhaps simply having a very low protein diet (short of causing illness ) would have almost just as good as an anti-aging effect? Don't know if that as already been tested.
  8. Subscribersonhouse
    Fast and Curious
    slatington, pa, usa
    Joined
    28 Dec '04
    Moves
    52619
    24 Dec '14 01:08
    Originally posted by humy
    http://medicalxpress.com/news/2014-12-molecular-mechanism-health-benefits-dietary.html
    "...A new study led by Harvard School of Public Health (HSPH) researchers identifies a key molecular mechanism behind the health benefits of dietary restriction, or reduced food intake without malnutrition. Also known as calorie restriction, dietary restriction is best known ...[text shortened]... uld have almost just as good as an anti-aging effect? Don't know if that as already been tested.
    Any studies of aging and vegetarians? Have they been found to live longer than meat eaters?
  9. Joined
    06 Mar '12
    Moves
    625
    24 Dec '14 07:195 edits
    Originally posted by sonhouse
    Any studies of aging and vegetarians? Have they been found to live longer than meat eaters?
    oh yes I know about that. But, as I understand it, the main reason why meat eaters live less long is because meat contains heme iron that increases the risk of cancer thus lowers life expectancy.
    Of course, you can have a vegetarian diet and still have a very high protein intake because of eating a lot of vegetarian meat-substitutes (that never contain heme iron ) so being vegetarian doesn't necessarily equate with eating less protein.
    I was wondering if any studies have been done to see what the effect on aging on vegetarians is by the vegetarians reducing protein intake as opposed to meat eaters reducing protein intake. Is the effect the same or different? perhaps there is little benefit for a vegetarian keeping his protein intake relatively low for a vegetarian? -actually, I think the answer to that is no, it would make a big difference even for a vegetarian to reduce protein intake because doing so should necessarily reduce ones IGF1 hormone levels independently of the source of that protein and that should have the effect of reducing the rate of aging if my memory serves me correctly.
  10. Subscribersonhouse
    Fast and Curious
    slatington, pa, usa
    Joined
    28 Dec '04
    Moves
    52619
    26 Dec '14 18:45
    Originally posted by humy
    oh yes I know about that. But, as I understand it, the main reason why meat eaters live less long is because meat contains heme iron that increases the risk of cancer thus lowers life expectancy.
    Of course, you can have a vegetarian diet and still have a very high protein intake because of eating a lot of vegetarian meat-substitutes (that never contain heme i ...[text shortened]... and that should have the effect of reducing the rate of aging if my memory serves me correctly.
    What vegetables have lower protein? Which ones have high protein? I would imagine something like avocado's may have higher protein, for sure it has high fat content. I really like avocado's!
    I used to live in a town that was on the road to Mount Palomar (the big telescope) and there were thousands of acres growing avocado's ATT.

    I was freshman and soph in college back then and would see these roadside avocado stands selling a big bag of them for one dollar! We had Mexican for Christmas dinner and I bought 4 avocado's, they cost 2 dollars EACH!
  11. Joined
    06 Mar '12
    Moves
    625
    26 Dec '14 19:232 edits
    Originally posted by sonhouse
    What vegetables have lower protein? Which ones have high protein? I would imagine something like avocado's may have higher protein, for sure it has high fat content. I really like avocado's!
    I used to live in a town that was on the road to Mount Palomar (the big telescope) and there were thousands of acres growing avocado's ATT.

    I was freshman and soph ...[text shortened]... dollar! We had Mexican for Christmas dinner and I bought 4 avocado's, they cost 2 dollars EACH!
    Which ones have high protein?

    bearing in mind that “vegetarian” doesn't necessarily mean fruit and fresh 'veg' like cabbage etc;
    Beans esp soya.
    Nuts including peanuts.
    Most meat substitutes (such as quorn) that are made to look and test like meat.
    Eggs.
    Some dairy products.

    Until recently my vegetarian diet was almost as high in protein as a typical meat eater's due to the meat substitutes I ate but now cut back drastically on those meat substitutes.

    I didn't know avocados are high in protein (for a fruit ) until I looked it up just now.
  12. Joined
    18 Jan '07
    Moves
    6879
    27 Dec '14 15:37
    Originally posted by sonhouse
    Any studies of aging and vegetarians? Have they been found to live longer than meat eaters?
    No, it just feels longer.
  13. Joined
    06 Mar '12
    Moves
    625
    27 Dec '14 17:542 edits
    Originally posted by Shallow Blue
    No, it just feels longer.
    There have been studies of how long vegetarians live compared to meat eaters:

    http://www.wsj.com/articles/SB10001424127887324423904578523190441042514

    And it appears that vegetarians do generally live longer but not so much because the aging process is less fast in them but rather mainly because they are much less likely to suffer early death from heart disease or cancer both of which red meat increases the risk of.

    I used to eat red meat when I was a young child but not because I wanted it but because my parents made me. Personally I honestly never liked the taste and texture of red meat anyway. I am not tempted in the slightest to have some even if it hypothetically is good for me and I knew it!
  14. Subscribersonhouse
    Fast and Curious
    slatington, pa, usa
    Joined
    28 Dec '04
    Moves
    52619
    30 Dec '14 03:172 edits
    Originally posted by humy
    There have been studies of how long vegetarians live compared to meat eaters:

    http://www.wsj.com/articles/SB10001424127887324423904578523190441042514

    And it appears that vegetarians do generally live longer but not so much because the aging process is less fast in them but rather mainly because they are much less likely to suffer early death from heart di ...[text shortened]... ot tempted in the slightest to have some even if it hypothetically is good for me and I knew it!
    Are there any vegetables that give the right amount of protein and all the amino acids? I wonder if Avocado is one of them? Well, I went to this site listing the nutritional value of Avocado and it seems to be very low in protein.

    http://www.avocadocentral.com/nutrition/avocado-nutrition-health-facts-label

    Here is one list of veggies with protein: Doesn't look like any of them are exactly loaded with them:

    http://www.womenshealthmag.com/nutrition/high-protein-vegetables
  15. Joined
    06 Mar '12
    Moves
    625
    30 Dec '14 09:3314 edits
    Originally posted by sonhouse
    Are there any vegetables that give the right amount of protein and all the amino acids? I wonder if Avocado is one of them? Well, I went to this site listing the nutritional value of Avocado and it seems to be very low in protein.

    http://www.avocadocentral.com/nutrition/avocado-nutrition-health-facts-label

    Here is one list of veggies with protein: Doe ...[text shortened]... re exactly loaded with them:

    http://www.womenshealthmag.com/nutrition/high-protein-vegetables
    You can easily get about the right balance of amino acids from non-meat protein simply by eating a variety of non-meat protein sources. For example, I have heard that a combination of milk and sweet corn happens to give the right balance. Also a combination of wheat and peas/beans/lentils also happens to give the right balance.

    Generally, with all else being equal, the greater the variety of food in your vegetarian diet, the more balanced its amino acids are likely to be. But it doesn't really matter that much if they are a bit unbalanced providing you don't become deficient in any one amino acid.

    Also, it should be noted that the early estimates of how much protein a human needs to eat to stay in good health, especially for an adult, were completely way out with the estimate being vastly too high (and they often still are ) by one or even sometimes two orders of magnitude out! As a result, it was once thought that it is absolutely essential to have a large amount of at least one very protein rich food in you diet, such as meat (what else? ), else you health would suffer severely.
    Although this myth of the need for consuming massive amounts of protein persists, we now know this is completely false and you can, providing you still get enough calories and other nutrient, sustainably stay in perfectly good health with nothing more for your main source of protein than, for example, a hand full of peas and half a pint of milk per day although growing children and pregnant woman usually need extra.

    When I was a kid, I once read an extremely old book about diet and health and, with what I now know is the completely wrong earlier estimates of how much protein we need, what it said was required in the diet to stay healthy. I never have forgotten it! It recommended eating, amongst other things, something like ten eggs, a huge wedge of cheese, and two huge beef stakes per day and it showed pictures of all that and the portions looked huge! I thought; if I ever ate that lot in one day, I would be violently sick!
Back to Top