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Science Forum

Science Forum

  1. Standard member Nemesio
    Ursulakantor
    27 Nov '08 18:55
    On various medical shows, they have shown circumstances where a person's
    white blood cell count drops below the point at which they can fight infection,
    whether because of some disease or because of radiation or whatever. My
    question is: Why can't they just repeatedly transfuse white blood cells to
    fight the infection, just like they transfuse platelets or red blood cells?

    Nemesio
  2. 27 Nov '08 21:21
    I guess it's because the body would reject those white blood cells, but I'm not sure.
  3. 27 Nov '08 21:24
    Originally posted by Nemesio
    On various medical shows, they have shown circumstances where a person's
    white blood cell count drops below the point at which they can fight infection,
    whether because of some disease or because of radiation or whatever. My
    question is: Why can't they just repeatedly transfuse white blood cells to
    fight the infection, just like they transfuse platelets or red blood cells?

    Nemesio
    As far as I am aware, they can. White blood cell transfusions are rare by comparison to red blood cell / platelets, but they are used for patients with immunosuppression who have severe infections that are antibiotic resistant.
  4. 27 Nov '08 21:26
    Originally posted by Policestate
    As far as I am aware, they can. White blood cell transfusions are rare by comparison to red blood cell / platelets, but they are used for patients with immunosuppression who have severe infections that are antibiotic resistant.
    Was beginning to doubt myself for a moment then, but the following is a link on the first results page of a google search.

    http://www.mcghealth.org/Greystonedata/CONTENT.ASP?PAGEID=P00106