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Science Forum

  1. 02 Dec '14 03:47 / 1 edit
    Just returned home from watching new movie---Interstellar. It was worth the cost of admission..good story but a bit TOO much on the human emotion side. Its focus was on Black Holes and what happens to TIME...quite a bit of Stretching the truth -- but OK movie. Has anyone here seen it yet ?
  2. Standard member sonhouse
    Fast and Curious
    02 Dec '14 11:58
    Originally posted by woadman
    Just returned home from watching new movie---Interstellar. It was worth the cost of admission..good story but a bit TOO much on the human emotion side. Its focus was on Black Holes and what happens to TIME...quite a bit of Stretching the truth -- but OK movie. Has anyone here seen it yet ?
    It was interesting, the development of the black hole sequences, they used a world renowned physicist, Kip Thorne to work up an accurate graphic for it. The interesting thing was, in doing new equations he developed, they discovered something new about black holes derived from the simulations developed specifically for the movie.

    He is writing up his results to be published in a real journal.

    I am still waiting for a time I can see the movie. It sounds great.

    BTW, did you hear there is a new Jurassic Park movie coming out also?
  3. 02 Dec '14 12:21
    Originally posted by woadman
    Just returned home from watching new movie---Interstellar. It was worth the cost of admission..good story but a bit TOO much on the human emotion side. Its focus was on Black Holes and what happens to TIME...quite a bit of Stretching the truth -- but OK movie. Has anyone here seen it yet ?
    The proposition that you can survive entering a black hole surprised me. What surprised me even more, however, is that apparently black holes are filled with bookshelves. No, it was a totally deep film with a sublime message too: love is good, and if you're fighting in space suits, don't let your opponent bang his helmet into yours, again, and again, and (you'd think he'd get it by now, but no) again, and again... awesome film.

  4. 02 Dec '14 15:19
    Did you notice the similarity to 2001 ?
  5. 02 Dec '14 15:20
    Was this based on a novel ? If so, I'd like to read it.
  6. 02 Dec '14 15:51
    Originally posted by C Hess
    The proposition that you can survive entering a black hole surprised me.
    My understanding was that:
    1) space is so stretch it would be survivable.
    2) time dilation means that you would never get there within the life time of the universe.
    Or am I mistaken?
  7. Standard member DeepThought
    Losing the Thread
    02 Dec '14 15:59
    Originally posted by twhitehead
    My understanding was that:
    1) space is so stretch it would be survivable.
    2) time dilation means that you would never get there within the life time of the universe.
    Or am I mistaken?
    In real life and not fiction, the gravitational force on one's feet would be so much more than on one's head that tidal forces would kill anyone falling into a black hole before they got as far as the escape horizon.

    Time dilation means that an asymptotic observer would see the victim falling towards the black hole with radiation from them being progressively redshifted. They would appear to fade out rather than cross the event horizon. In the frame of reference of the inward falling body the whole thing would be over in a very short amount of time.
  8. 02 Dec '14 16:05
    if you were on a spaceship watching a person fall into a black hole..wouldn't they appear to completely stop ? Their time would be infinite at the event horizon ?
  9. Standard member sonhouse
    Fast and Curious
    02 Dec '14 17:41
    Originally posted by woadman
    if you were on a spaceship watching a person fall into a black hole..wouldn't they appear to completely stop ? Their time would be infinite at the event horizon ?
    They would certainly be seen as slowing down a lot, and the smaller the black hole, the faster they would be seen to stop.
  10. Subscriber Suzianne
    Misfit Queen
    03 Dec '14 18:16
    Originally posted by woadman
    Did you notice the similarity to 2001 ?
    I caught this as well, especially the last space sequences.
  11. Subscriber Suzianne
    Misfit Queen
    03 Dec '14 18:19
    Originally posted by woadman
    if you were on a spaceship watching a person fall into a black hole..wouldn't they appear to completely stop ? Their time would be infinite at the event horizon ?
    Yes, and this is also why matter falling into a black hole, after glowing in xrays from the process, seems to amass into an accretion disk.
  12. Subscriber Suzianne
    Misfit Queen
    03 Dec '14 18:22
    Originally posted by DeepThought
    In real life and not fiction, the gravitational force on one's feet would be so much more than on one's head that tidal forces would kill anyone falling into a black hole before they got as far as the escape horizon.

    Time dilation means that an asymptotic observer would see the victim falling towards the black hole with radiation from them being progr ...[text shortened]... ference of the inward falling body the whole thing would be over in a very short amount of time.
    I always thought with a sufficiently large black hole that one may not realize when one has passed the event horizon. Not immediately, anyway.
  13. Standard member DeepThought
    Losing the Thread
    03 Dec '14 18:44
    Originally posted by Suzianne
    I always thought with a sufficiently large black hole that one may not realize when one has passed the event horizon. Not immediately, anyway.
    I read that somewhere. I'll do a back of an envelope calculation once I've finished with Adam Warlock's problem and check that claim.
  14. 03 Dec '14 18:53
    I quite liked the movie, although most of the physics discussed in it is a load of bull, obviously.
  15. Standard member sonhouse
    Fast and Curious
    04 Dec '14 01:08 / 1 edit
    Originally posted by KazetNagorra
    I quite liked the movie, although most of the physics discussed in it is a load of bull, obviously.
    Did you see the interview with Kip Thorne? About his new equations describing the black hole and seems to found something publishable from the simulations they worked up?

    http://www.planetary.org/multimedia/planetary-radio/show/2014/1202-kip-thorne-and-the-science-of-interstellar.html

    I just saw, he was the executive producer of Interstellar!