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  1. Standard member sonhouse
    Fast and Curious
    02 Dec '09 14:33
    Assuming the conditions on Titan is conducive for life to form, given the extreme low temps, could life evolve some form of moving animal? Multi-celled organisms presumably, but how much energy could they generate? Humans run at about 37 degrees C and the average temp on earth is lower than that so humans are generating more energy than the average surface temp. If that happens on Titan, how much more could you go temperature wise? If you had a life form that got too hot for that moon, then the organic seas would boil where that life form lived, it would seem not too likely that that would happen.
    So given all that, could some kind of moving animal evolve, given enough time?
  2. 02 Dec '09 17:41 / 1 edit
    Originally posted by sonhouse
    Humans run at about 37 degrees C and the average temp on earth is lower than that so humans are generating more energy than the average surface temp. I
    It is an interesting observation. Humans are a bad example because we have evolved to be warm blooded because its beneficial, but it is hardly a requirement. It makes more sense to look at plants first and then things like jelly fish and reptiles.

    The real issue is that if the life form evolved in a liquid with a low boiling point, would the life forms internal machinery consist of the same liquid. If it evolved chemicals that raise the boiling point of its internal cellular structure, I am sure it could solve any issues with heat. In fact the ability to boil the surrounding sea would probably be a very useful propulsion mechanism. Steam powered animals!
  3. Subscriber AThousandYoung
    Do ya think?
    03 Dec '09 03:25 / 7 edits
    Originally posted by twhitehead
    It is an interesting observation. Humans are a bad example because we have evolved to be warm blooded because its beneficial, but it is hardly a requirement. It makes more sense to look at plants first and then things like jelly fish and reptiles.

    The real issue is that if the life form evolved in a liquid with a low boiling point, would the life forms ...[text shortened]... the surrounding sea would probably be a very useful propulsion mechanism. Steam powered animals!
    I doubt life could evolve in such a liquid. The same properties of water that make it have a high boiling point allow it to dissolve reactive chemicals and host complex chemistry.

    If there was little energy available for life, it would be sluggish and simple, I expect.
  4. 03 Dec '09 06:05
    Originally posted by AThousandYoung
    I doubt life could evolve in such a liquid. The same properties of water that make it have a high boiling point allow it to dissolve reactive chemicals and host complex chemistry.

    If there was little energy available for life, it would be sluggish and simple, I expect.
    Simply because the liquids have a low boiling temperature does not mean there is no energy stored in them. On the contrary, I rather think that Titans oceans would have far more stored energy than water - Titans oceans are similar to oil.
  5. Subscriber AThousandYoung
    Do ya think?
    06 Dec '09 03:25
    Originally posted by twhitehead
    Simply because the liquids have a low boiling temperature does not mean there is no energy stored in them. On the contrary, I rather think that Titans oceans would have far more stored energy than water - Titans oceans are similar to oil.
    That's not what I meant.

    I meant that there is little energy coming in from the sun. If life evolved that actually fed on the oceans the oceans would dry up eventually you'd think.

    No, I was referring to the high stability and polarity of water molecules, and their small size, etc.