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  1. Standard member sonhouse
    Fast and Curious
    05 Apr '09 01:01
    I saw at a bargain outlet 3 different Linux books, each with Linux versions on CD's in them, the newest from 2006, which is the one I got, Red Hat Fedora and Enterprise Linux 4. They also had another Red Hat Linux and Suse Linux. Anyone familiar with these three versions, is any one better than the other? I got the Fedora version simply because it was the newest, from 06, the others from 05 and '04. They were all about 8$ US, around 40 to 50 bucks new. So is the one I got worth studying or have things advanced too much in the last three years bother having something that old? The one I got is authored by Christopher Negus and the enterprise Linux version says it is a reduced set of Core 4. I want to run audio production software, should I get the full set somewhere? Thanks in advance.
  2. 05 Apr '09 14:37
    Originally posted by sonhouse
    I saw at a bargain outlet 3 different Linux books, each with Linux versions on CD's in them, the newest from 2006, which is the one I got, Red Hat Fedora and Enterprise Linux 4. They also had another Red Hat Linux and Suse Linux. Anyone familiar with these three versions, is any one better than the other? I got the Fedora version simply because it was the ...[text shortened]... want to run audio production software, should I get the full set somewhere? Thanks in advance.
    Linux is open source and so there are plenty of free downloadable versions. If you have cheap internet access then download the latest, the book will probably still do fine, though again with internet access you could probably learn just as much for free -but since you already bought it might as well use it.
    What do you want to learn and why?
    I haven't used a whole lot of Linux and when I have they have been a couple of years out of date so I don't know which is better or where they have got to, of what I did use I preferred Redhat to Suse.
    I suggest you start with choosing your audio production software and see what that recommends you use.
  3. Standard member sonhouse
    Fast and Curious
    05 Apr '09 19:08 / 1 edit
    Originally posted by twhitehead
    Linux is open source and so there are plenty of free downloadable versions. If you have cheap internet access then download the latest, the book will probably still do fine, though again with internet access you could probably learn just as much for free -but since you already bought it might as well use it.
    What do you want to learn and why?
    I haven't t you start with choosing your audio production software and see what that recommends you use.
    Thanks for the reply. Do you know the dif between redhat and redhat Fedora? I'll start looking at audio production software today, see what googles up.
    Well this one looks promising, 42 audio production programs!
    http://www.linuxlinks.com/article/20080622143124178/Audio.html
  4. 06 Apr '09 07:56
    Originally posted by sonhouse
    Thanks for the reply. Do you know the dif between redhat and redhat Fedora? I'll start looking at audio production software today, see what googles up.
    Well this one looks promising, 42 audio production programs!
    http://www.linuxlinks.com/article/20080622143124178/Audio.html
    Redhats open source model is to continually develop open source software which is freely available, cutting edge, but may have bugs etc. They then have a paid for version that they ensure is reasonably stable and for which they provide an update service, support etc.
    Fedora is the cutting edge - no guarantee version. Redhat Linux is the paid for more stable - but less cutting edge version.
    As a private, non-mission critical user you would almost certainly go for Fedora.

    I use other Redhat products for my programming, Seam and JBoss AS.
    I use windows for development and the production server is Linux, but I do not know what linux as I have very little interaction with it.
  5. Standard member sonhouse
    Fast and Curious
    06 Apr '09 22:46
    Originally posted by twhitehead
    Redhats open source model is to continually develop open source software which is freely available, cutting edge, but may have bugs etc. They then have a paid for version that they ensure is reasonably stable and for which they provide an update service, support etc.
    Fedora is the cutting edge - no guarantee version. Redhat Linux is the paid for more sta ...[text shortened]... duction server is Linux, but I do not know what linux as I have very little interaction with it.
    Well I went to the Fedora site and it is up to V 10, with V11 in Beta, so I guess my 'core 4' level one would be a bit behind. Any idea what would be in 10 that would not be in 4? Thinking about networking and audio and video stuff, recording software and such. BTW, do you have to have certain versions of linux to run apps? Like if I got a HD audio recorder would it have to run under say, redhat vs Suse or some such or are there agreements that anyone's linux will run anyone's software?
  6. 07 Apr '09 10:43
    Originally posted by sonhouse
    Well I went to the Fedora site and it is up to V 10, with V11 in Beta, so I guess my 'core 4' level one would be a bit behind. Any idea what would be in 10 that would not be in 4? Thinking about networking and audio and video stuff, recording software and such. BTW, do you have to have certain versions of linux to run apps? Like if I got a HD audio recorder ...[text shortened]... vs Suse or some such or are there agreements that anyone's linux will run anyone's software?
    I know very little about it but I have heard that some apps prefer or require some versions (as in brands) of Linux.
    I think you would find later versions easier to use and would have more drivers etc.
    If you have a pc available then simply install the version of linux you have, get hold of the software you want to run and see what happens. You will probably find out fairly quickly if they are incompatible or if you do not have the necessary drivers for your hardware.
    But if your internet access is reasonably cheap on the per megabyte cost then consider downloading the latest version. Here in SA internet access is not cheap but I believe we are one of the more expensive parts of the world.
  7. 07 Apr '09 10:55 / 1 edit
    Originally posted by sonhouse
    I saw at a bargain outlet 3 different Linux books, each with Linux versions on CD's in them, the newest from 2006, which is the one I got, Red Hat Fedora and Enterprise Linux 4. They also had another Red Hat Linux and Suse Linux. Anyone familiar with these three versions, is any one better than the other? I got the Fedora version simply because it was the want to run audio production software, should I get the full set somewhere? Thanks in advance.
    I have only ever used a command-line version of Linux, so really I'm not qualified to talk. However, I've a good friend that recommends the "Ubuntu" distribution, and it is one of my aims for the summer to install it.

    www.ubuntu.com/

    No idea about audio production software for it. However, Linux programs seem to be much cheaper (often free) compared to their windows counterparts, although of course this may change when you start dealing with professional-level programs (is that the word? 'proper' programs, not just word processors or whatnot).
  8. Standard member DeepThought
    Losing the Thread
    07 Apr '09 16:17
    Originally posted by Swlabr
    I have only ever used a command-line version of Linux, so really I'm not qualified to talk. However, I've a good friend that recommends the "Ubuntu" distribution, and it is one of my aims for the summer to install it.

    www.ubuntu.com/

    No idea about audio production software for it. However, Linux programs seem to be much cheaper (often free) compared to ...[text shortened]... level programs (is that the word? 'proper' programs, not just word processors or whatnot).
    It´s what I use. It works out of the box and downloads updates when they happen. There really isn´t that much to choose between different distributions, all the real difference is is look and feel. If you need some program or capability then if it doesn´t come with the distribution you have you just download it from where ever the main repository is and it should work,

    My main gripe with Ubuntu is that SCID comes without tablebase support, which since I spent a boring few hours downloading them one at a time from Hyatt´s website is kind of annoying. Since it´s linux I could download the source code and build with the required compiler option, so it wasn´t exactly a problem.
  9. Standard member sonhouse
    Fast and Curious
    08 Apr '09 01:30
    Originally posted by DeepThought
    It´s what I use. It works out of the box and downloads updates when they happen. There really isn´t that much to choose between different distributions, all the real difference is is look and feel. If you need some program or capability then if it doesn´t come with the distribution you have you just download it from where ever the main repository is a ...[text shortened]... oad the source code and build with the required compiler option, so it wasn´t exactly a problem.
    Help me out here: What is SCID and tablebase support? I am not into programming, just an end user mainly for audio recording.
  10. 08 Apr '09 07:01
    Originally posted by DeepThought
    It´s what I use. It works out of the box and downloads updates when they happen. There really isn´t that much to choose between different distributions, all the real difference is is look and feel. If you need some program or capability then if it doesn´t come with the distribution you have you just download it from where ever the main repository is a ...[text shortened]... oad the source code and build with the required compiler option, so it wasn´t exactly a problem.
    I also use Ubuntu. It is the most popular flavour at the moment. As others have said, get the latest if you can. Either dowload itor get them to send you a DVD, which they should do for a minimal charge.

    Any of the major distrbutions should work pretty much out of the box for most things and once you've figoured out their package management system, downloading and installing new applications (packages) is very easy.

    I think that music and sound processing is perceived as fairly sexy so their should be plenty of high quality open source (free) software out there.

    --- Penguin.
  11. Standard member DeepThought
    Losing the Thread
    08 Apr '09 12:32
    Originally posted by sonhouse
    Help me out here: What is SCID and tablebase support? I am not into programming, just an end user mainly for audio recording.
    SCID is Shane´s Chess Information Database - so a chess database program, and table bases are end game table bases - data bases of 3, 4, and 5 piece end games.
  12. Standard member sonhouse
    Fast and Curious
    09 Apr '09 03:44
    Originally posted by DeepThought
    SCID is Shane´s Chess Information Database - so a chess database program, and table bases are end game table bases - data bases of 3, 4, and 5 piece end games.
    Ah, thanks, I thought it was some arcane programming thing.
  13. 23 Apr '09 02:25
    Originally posted by sonhouse
    Thanks for the reply. Do you know the dif between redhat and redhat Fedora? I'll start looking at audio production software today, see what googles up.
    Well this one looks promising, 42 audio production programs!
    http://www.linuxlinks.com/article/20080622143124178/Audio.html
    You can download Ubuntu Studio. It comes with many Audio, Video, and 3D programs.

    Be advised though, there is a large learning curve.

    I use Cubase and Guitar Pro in Windows and the closest thing I could find for Linux was Ardour and Tuxguitar. Although there are others.

    I'm great at using computers and good at using audio production software. But I could not, for the life of me, make Ubuntu work like I needed it to. So I scampered back to Windows with my tail between my legs.

    One day I will use Linux exclusively, but right now I have to use my Windows based software.
  14. Standard member sonhouse
    Fast and Curious
    25 Apr '09 01:31
    Originally posted by Wayne1324
    You can download Ubuntu Studio. It comes with many Audio, Video, and 3D programs.

    Be advised though, there is a large learning curve.

    I use Cubase and Guitar Pro in Windows and the closest thing I could find for Linux was Ardour and Tuxguitar. Although there are others.

    I'm great at using computers and good at using audio production software. But ...[text shortened]...

    One day I will use Linux exclusively, but right now I have to use my Windows based software.
    Have you tried Cakewalk Sonar and their other products? I use Sonar, am getting ready to upgrade to Sonar 8, it also has a steep learning curve but I have been using it for years, did my self produced CD with it and a bit of Pro Tools LE and Sound Forge and the like.
  15. 22 May '09 05:51
    I'm on to Ubuntu and loving it... "Software is like sex... better when it's free!" :-)