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Science Forum

  1. Standard member sonhouse
    Fast and Curious
    24 May '12 20:25
    http://futureinnovation.larc.nasa.gov/view/articles/futurism/bushnell/low-energy-nuclear-reactions.html

    NASA has seen some results that go past chemistry, and a new theory has popped up about it. "LENR", Low Energy Nuclear Reactions.
  2. 25 May '12 07:03
    I found the article extremely vague and in some places unintelligible.
  3. Standard member sonhouse
    Fast and Curious
    25 May '12 12:26
    Originally posted by twhitehead
    I found the article extremely vague and in some places unintelligible.
    Yeah, I think they are still at a very early stage with this and may be blowing soap bubbles but it is worth looking at even if it is a low probability situation. Ten years down the line maybe they will understand it so well they can say with certainty yea or nay.
  4. 25 May '12 12:57
    I cannot even get onto that link: I just get a connection error every time I try.
  5. Standard member sonhouse
    Fast and Curious
    25 May '12 14:18
    Originally posted by humy
    I cannot even get onto that link: I just get a connection error every time I try.
    Where do you live? Might have something to do with your server. I just activated the link just now. 10:18 AM 5-25-2012 EDT.
  6. 25 May '12 19:32
    Originally posted by sonhouse
    Where do you live? Might have something to do with your server. I just activated the link just now. 10:18 AM 5-25-2012 EDT.
    I live in the south of Wales in the UK
  7. Subscriber AThousandYoung
    Do ya think?
    25 May '12 21:27
    http://ecat.com/ecat-questions/how-does-an-ecat-work

    Apparently it's possible to use chemical catalysts to help nickel fuse with a proton (hydrogen nucleus) transforming the nickel to copper and releasing heat in the process.
  8. Standard member sonhouse
    Fast and Curious
    26 May '12 00:44 / 2 edits
    Originally posted by AThousandYoung
    http://ecat.com/ecat-questions/how-does-an-ecat-work

    Apparently it's possible to use chemical catalysts to help nickel fuse with a proton (hydrogen nucleus) transforming the nickel to copper and releasing heat in the process.
    In that link the reporter said they got to see inside the reactor but they did not show a video of that, and which one they opened. If they opened up the one from the demo they did not have video.

    They also did not have to use aluminum foil to cover it, they could have made it totally out of glass so everything would have been visible. If it didn't produce quite as much heat, no big deal. It would show there was not a car battery or something inside producing the energy.

    I would have to see them put one together from scratch, watch the entire assembly process and then see it start producing energy and not for just 3 hours at the claimed 5 kw output, that is only about 15 kwhr at best and that can be faked.

    If I saw them assemble it and saw there was no energy source from current technology and THEN produced power not for 3 hours but for 60 hours or so, that would be about 300 Kwhr, an entirely different situation than one running for a couple or three hours, 300 Kwhr from a box the size of a toaster-oven like they showed would be impossible for any normal source. I would also have to rule out induction heaters under the table.

    The energy could be transmitted from as much as 6 feet away and you would not feel it. There is technology like that readily available. I would like to see them put it together and me supply the table and let it run for a few days, that would satisfy me.
  9. Subscriber AThousandYoung
    Do ya think?
    26 May '12 18:15
    One thing that bothers me is that I've heard fusion only works for elements smaller than iron. The argument here is that nickel, which is heavier than iron, is fusing to make something even heavier than that - copper. That shouldn't work.
  10. Standard member sonhouse
    Fast and Curious
    26 May '12 21:07
    Originally posted by AThousandYoung
    One thing that bothers me is that I've heard fusion only works for elements smaller than iron. The argument here is that nickel, which is heavier than iron, is fusing to make something even heavier than that - copper. That shouldn't work.
    In hot fusion that is right, iron is star poop. The end of the fusion road and the end of the fission road. Not sure how they rationalize that in LENR theory. I also don't know what a 'heavy' electron is either. The only 'heavy' electron I know about is the muon, an electron like particle but 200 times heavier.
  11. 27 May '12 11:11
    Originally posted by sonhouse
    In hot fusion that is right, iron is star poop. The end of the fusion road and the end of the fission road. Not sure how they rationalize that in LENR theory. I also don't know what a 'heavy' electron is either. The only 'heavy' electron I know about is the muon, an electron like particle but 200 times heavier.
    There is also a heavier version called the tau particle. The tau is approximately 17 times heavier than a muon, but otherwise has the same properties.
  12. Standard member sonhouse
    Fast and Curious
    27 May '12 15:48
    Originally posted by KazetNagorra
    There is also a heavier version called the tau particle. The tau is approximately 17 times heavier than a muon, but otherwise has the same properties.
    So that particle is something like the mass of a proton.
  13. Subscriber AThousandYoung
    Do ya think?
    27 May '12 18:12
    Is the tau particle the same as the antiproton?
  14. 27 May '12 20:56
    Originally posted by AThousandYoung
    Is the tau particle the same as the antiproton?
    No. A proton is a composite particle consisting of three quarks (two up, one down). An antiproton is similar, but consists of two anti-up and one anti-down quark. The quarks are glued together by the strong nuclear force, transmitted through particles called gluons (like the photons that transmit electromagnetic interactions).
  15. Subscriber AThousandYoung
    Do ya think?
    27 May '12 21:01
    Originally posted by KazetNagorra
    No. A proton is a composite particle consisting of three quarks (two up, one down). An antiproton is similar, but consists of two anti-up and one anti-down quark. The quarks are glued together by the strong nuclear force, transmitted through particles called gluons (like the photons that transmit electromagnetic interactions).
    And the tau?