Please turn on javascript in your browser to play chess.
Science Forum

Science Forum

  1. Standard member woodypusher
    misanthrope
    02 Nov '13 04:53
    http://scienceblog.com/67577/could-a-milky-way-supernova-be-visible-from-earth-in-next-50-years/
  2. Standard member sonhouse
    Fast and Curious
    03 Nov '13 22:23 / 2 edits
    Originally posted by woodypusher
    http://scienceblog.com/67577/could-a-milky-way-supernova-be-visible-from-earth-in-next-50-years/
    Do you know how far away this star is? And why they think it may go nova? If it is within 5000 light years of Earth it could be disaster time. Supernova's are dangerous beasts, you don't want to be anywhere close to them. The fact it may not even be visible to the naked eye is a good sign, could be halfway across the galaxy, say 50,000 light years. Anyway, I won't be around one way or the other unless I live to the age of 122 Hey, it could happen!
  3. Standard member woodypusher
    misanthrope
    04 Nov '13 03:07
    Originally posted by sonhouse
    Do you know how far away this star is? And why they think it may go nova? If it is within 5000 light years of Earth it could be disaster time. Supernova's are dangerous beasts, you don't want to be anywhere close to them. The fact it may not even be visible to the naked eye is a good sign, could be halfway across the galaxy, say 50,000 light years. Anyway, I won't be around one way or the other unless I live to the age of 122 Hey, it could happen!
    Wherever it is, it probably already happened many thousands of years ago.
  4. 04 Nov '13 05:38
    Originally posted by woodypusher
    Wherever it is, it probably already happened many thousands of years ago.
    Actually, where it is tells us exactly how long ago it happened.
  5. Standard member sonhouse
    Fast and Curious
    04 Nov '13 12:43
    Originally posted by twhitehead
    Actually, where it is tells us exactly how long ago it happened.
    We won't know till the light gets here.
  6. 05 Nov '13 06:29
    Originally posted by sonhouse
    We won't know till the light gets here.
    Even if we had a magical rocket that could stop supernovas, we couldn't use it.
  7. Standard member sonhouse
    Fast and Curious
    05 Nov '13 16:35
    Originally posted by twhitehead
    Even if we had a magical rocket that could stop supernovas, we couldn't use it.
    More like a thick lead shield in orbit around the Earth or using the moon as a shield, moving it about so it will be between us and the nova. Piece of cake
  8. 06 Nov '13 10:45
    Originally posted by sonhouse
    More like a thick lead shield in orbit around the Earth or using the moon as a shield, moving it about so it will be between us and the nova. Piece of cake
    However, if we are relying on seeing the nova before we act, we have no hope.

    I guess if we analyze all nearby stars we might see signs before it goes supernova.
  9. Standard member menace71
    Can't win a game of
    07 Nov '13 06:33
    http://www.space.com/22446-supernova-shockwave-speed.html



    Manny
  10. Standard member menace71
    Can't win a game of
    07 Nov '13 06:41
    http://www.dailymail.co.uk/sciencetech/article-1349383/Betelgeuse-second-sun-Earth-supernova-turns-night-day.html


    Apparently we'd be ok if this one goes off but it's under 700 Light Years away

    Manny
  11. 08 Nov '13 07:34
    Originally posted by menace71
    http://www.dailymail.co.uk/sciencetech/article-1349383/Betelgeuse-second-sun-Earth-supernova-turns-night-day.html


    Apparently we'd be ok if this one goes off but it's under 700 Light Years away

    Manny
    I would think that having two suns for a week would do major damage to the Earth, although it may depend on what radiation other than visible light we receive.
  12. 13 Nov '13 09:29 / 5 edits
    [off topic]
    I don't think it is worth starting a new thread about this so I mention it here instead:

    I found this link about a space probe:

    http://phys.org/news/2013-11-maven-solar-electron-microscopic.html

    but what I find amusing about this link is where it says:

    "one of its instruments will look to electrically charged particles called electrons for answers. "

    What? really? there exist charged particles called "electrons"? -and we didn't all know that!? -so they had to say "charged particles called electrons" and not just simply "electrons" in the above to make sure we know what electrons are else we wouldn't have the foggiest idea what the HELL they are talking about!!! ?

    [/off topic]
  13. 13 Nov '13 20:24
    Originally posted by sonhouse
    Do you know how far away this star is? And why they think it may go nova? If it is within 5000 light years of Earth it could be disaster time. Supernova's are dangerous beasts, you don't want to be anywhere close to them. The fact it may not even be visible to the naked eye is a good sign, could be halfway across the galaxy, say 50,000 light years. Anyway, I won't be around one way or the other unless I live to the age of 122 Hey, it could happen!
    Supernova are indeed powerful...

    But you don't need to start stocking up on extra strength sunscreen unless its inside
    of 100 ly away. [probably a lot less]

    A gmma-ray burst (pointed right at us) would be dangerous at much greater ranges.
    But a regular supernova doesn't threaten us unless it's right in our back yard.

    http://blogs.discovermagazine.com/badastronomy/2012/05/18/the-closest-supernova-candidate/

    http://www.slate.com/blogs/bad_astronomy/2013/08/13/are_the_stars_you_see_in_the_sky_already_dead.html
  14. Standard member menace71
    Can't win a game of
    23 Nov '13 19:01
    I've read some items on-line and the consensus seems to be between 150-200 L.Y. is about the limit if a supernova went off close to the earth and apparently it also matters where the Gamma Ray burst are aimed


    Manny
  15. Standard member menace71
    Can't win a game of
    23 Nov '13 19:06
    There are about 75 Stars within 20 light years of us but have no clue on if any of them pose a threat of going supernova


    Manny