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Science Forum

Science Forum

  1. 29 Dec '13 05:45
    Never really thought about it before but presumed so.

    When their is a full moon in one part of the world is their a full moon everywhere?

    I kind of figured it would be different, but thinking about it, why? The earth is spinning around and the mood is spinning around it to create the different stages of the moon. My conclusion is that like the sun the moon would appear in a different position throughout the seasons but the size would be same in each part of the world on the same day.

    Is this right?

    Right now in Europe the moon is really small. Of course it's the same size as it always is but you know what I mean.
  2. Standard member Soothfast
    0,1,1,2,3,5,8,13,21,
    29 Dec '13 06:43 / 2 edits
    Originally posted by Trev33
    Never really thought about it before but presumed so.

    When their is a full moon in one part of the world is their a full moon everywhere?

    I kind of figured it would be different, but thinking about it, why? The earth is spinning around and the mood is spinning around it to create the different stages of the moon. My conclusion is that like the sun the m ...[text shortened]... the moon is really small. Of course it's the same size as it always is but you know what I mean.
    Yes, the moon is perceived as full everywhere on Earth. Both bodies are very small compared to the distance separating them. Imagine a lamp (O) shining on one side of a room. Take two peas (o and o) to the other side of the room and hold them six inches apart in this configuration:

    O………………………………………………….…………………………………………………….………….………….….o…….o.

    Earth is the left pea, and the moon is the right pea. No microbe on the left pea will be able to see the right pea as being anything but in "full" phase. The entire left half of the right pea is fully illuminated, so there's no way to see any dark portion of the right pea from the vantage point of the left pea.
  3. Standard member sonhouse
    Fast and Curious
    29 Dec '13 21:14 / 1 edit
    Originally posted by Soothfast
    Yes, the moon is perceived as full everywhere on Earth. Both bodies are very small compared to the distance separating them. Imagine a lamp (O) shining on one side of a room. Take two peas (o and o) to the other side of the room and hold them six inches apart in this configuration:

    O………………………………………………….…………………………………………………….………….………….….o…….o.

    Earth ...[text shortened]... there's no way to see any dark portion of the right pea from the vantage point of the left pea.
    A complete circle of the moon's orbit is about 2.4 million Km, and the diameter of the moon is about 3400 km, so there is about 1 degree difference from one edge to the other, not enough to make much difference in the moon image at full moon.