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  1. Standard member sonhouse
    Fast and Curious
    13 Feb '14 12:43 / 1 edit
    http://phys.org/news/2014-02-nif-gain-fusion-fuel.html#ajTabs

    Fusion is beginning to show its worth, the 50 years is getting closer!

    http://phys.org/news/2013-08-laser-fusion-yields-energy.html#inlRlv
  2. 13 Feb '14 18:42
    But I wonder how many years it will take to really get it out of the lab and into the real world power generation. If it takes much more than ~20 years, I bet it would be made redundant by the combination of renewables and off-the-grid storage before it even has a chance to pan out -and then it would be all for nothing.
  3. Standard member sonhouse
    Fast and Curious
    13 Feb '14 20:34
    Originally posted by humy
    But I wonder how many years it will take to really get it out of the lab and into the real world power generation. If it takes much more than ~20 years, I bet it would be made redundant by the combination of renewables and off-the-grid storage before it even has a chance to pan out -and then it would be all for nothing.
    I don't think it will be THAT bad, it looks like inertial fusion is beating the ITER tokamak concept so we will see. At least there are several fusion technologies being pursued, it would not do to put all the tech eggs in one basket. There is still fission, it will be around for decades like it or not. I think it sucks but I don't have any political pull. Solar keeps getting more efficient and cheaper with a number of different technologies pursued, organic for instance. Then there is the wave power strips under water, that sounds promising. The thing is, we need a lot of different kinds of technologies producing energy so if some total roadblock happens with one technique others can take its place, like a lot of countries are forgoing nuclear but others will replace that.
  4. Subscriber joe shmo
    Strange Egg
    13 Feb '14 23:09
    Originally posted by humy
    But I wonder how many years it will take to really get it out of the lab and into the real world power generation. If it takes much more than ~20 years, I bet it would be made redundant by the combination of renewables and off-the-grid storage before it even has a chance to pan out -and then it would be all for nothing.
    "all for nothing"...really?
  5. 14 Feb '14 08:14 / 3 edits
    Originally posted by joe shmo
    "all for nothing"...really?
    If it being made obsolete even before it is made practical means it will never be used on Earth, yes.
    I predict fission will eventually be used in space -but that is a VERY long way off and hardly worth researching it for that purpose right now.
  6. Standard member sonhouse
    Fast and Curious
    14 Feb '14 08:52
    Originally posted by humy
    If it being made obsolete even before it is made practical means it will never be used on Earth, yes.
    I predict fission will eventually be used in space -but that is a VERY long way off and hardly worth researching it for that purpose right now.
    Fission is already being used in space, several probes including Curiosity are nuke powered. Fusion has a better chance of success as a propulsion system than fission and that would pretty much open up the whole solar system, for instance, if you can muster up a 1 g long term propulsion, just about the entire solar system is reachable within a week or two and that includes Pluto and the outer dwarf planets.
  7. 14 Feb '14 10:28 / 5 edits
    Originally posted by sonhouse
    Fission is already being used in space, several probes including Curiosity are nuke powered. Fusion has a better chance of success as a propulsion system than fission and that would pretty much open up the whole solar system, for instance, if you can muster up a 1 g long term propulsion, just about the entire solar system is reachable within a week or two and that includes Pluto and the outer dwarf planets.
    Sorry, mispost; I meant to say "fusion"in that post, not "fission" Sorry for the confusion.

    Does anyone know why I am seeing my smiliys ("" ) appear with their right side chopped off? Is this a bug at my end or at this website?
  8. 14 Feb '14 10:33 / 1 edit
    Originally posted by humy
    If it being made obsolete even before it is made practical means it will never be used on Earth, yes.
    I predict fission will eventually be used in space -but that is a VERY long way off and hardly worth researching it for that purpose right now.
    mispost; I meant to say "fusion" there, not "fission" like I did which meant my post didn't make much sense. I do know the big difference between the two.
  9. Standard member sonhouse
    Fast and Curious
    14 Feb '14 11:02
    Originally posted by humy
    mispost; I meant to say "fusion" there, not "fission" like I did which meant my post didn't make much sense. I do know the big difference between the two.
    Well we are very glad to hear that

    BTW, the pundits say fusion rockets will be easier to make than fission since you are just going for thrust and don't have to worry too much about details like radiation and such, they say you build a mile long accelerator basically and you can get fusion and a lot more thrust and long lasting thrust than fission or chemical rockets.