Morse Code

SubscriberFMF
Science 01 May '11 16:59
  1. SubscriberFMF
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    01 May '11 16:591 edit
    The morse code has served its purpose, run its course, had its day, outrun its usefulness and relevance. If I could erase it from my memory, would my brain be - to some small, small, small measurable degree - more efficient and more capable of taking on and storing new, more applicable information? Or is the fact that I still know the morse code, literally, of no consequence - good or bad?
  2. Germany
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    01 May '11 17:29
    I don't think anyone can answer that question. The brain is too complex to work out in such detail what it does - at least at this point in time.
  3. Subscribersonhouse
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    06 May '11 22:201 edit
    Originally posted by FMF
    The morse code has served its purpose, run its course, had its day, outrun its usefulness and relevance. If I could erase it from my memory, would my brain be - to some small, small, small measurable degree - more efficient and more capable of taking on and storing new, more applicable information? Or is the fact that I still know the morse code, literally, of no consequence - good or bad?
    So I can assume you were in some kind of military radio core? I am a ham, and I can tell you CW is still very much with us, for instance, it is a medium on radio that can get messages through noise and such better than any other modulation method including any of the newer digital schemes. It takes a lot less power and uses a hundred times less bandwidth and that alone assures the link of a relatively high signal to noise ratio. Hams keep code alive. You can pump a lot of power into a bandwidth of 20 or 30 hertz.DE AI3N.

    As to whether the memory of decoding code if gone would help your brain in other functions, I would say no since the data base for code is rather small, just an association of 26 letters, 10 numbers and some punctuation. It would not be like someone speaking Icelandic for instance, and through some techno breakthrough, able to lose Icelandic to be able to be for instance, a better figure skater or some such, there would be more cells associated with a whole language, thousands of times more cells than it ever would have from learning code.
  4. Standard membermenace71
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    07 May '11 03:21
    My Dad was a Ham radio operator. I remember his call sign was WA6ANR. He would use Morse Code and I remember him saying it became a second language of sorts.





    Manny
  5. Cape Town
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    07 May '11 07:39
    Originally posted by FMF
    Or is the fact that I still know the morse code, literally, of no consequence - good or bad?
    It is probably of consequence. It probably does take up some storage space, but I am inclined to think that the way the human brain works, it could be overwritten if necessary, but far more importantly, it actually serves a purpose as a database key to other information. So if you erased it you might forget other stuff that you want to remember. Also, the fact that you know it may aid you in learning other similar types of information.
  6. SubscriberFMF
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    07 May '11 13:54
    Originally posted by sonhouse
    So I can assume you were in some kind of military radio core?
    I was into SW radio when I was a teenager because it was one of my dad's hobbies.
  7. SubscriberFMF
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    07 May '11 13:55
    Originally posted by twhitehead
    It is probably of consequence. It probably does take up some storage space, but I am inclined to think that the way the human brain works, it could be overwritten if necessary, but far more importantly, it actually serves a purpose as a database key to other information. So if you erased it you might forget other stuff that you want to remember.
    When I learned to speak Indonesian it effectively overwrote my ability to speak French.
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