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  1. Standard member sonhouse
    Fast and Curious
    18 Jul '14 02:16
    http://phys.org/news/2014-07-universe.html

    These guys are making models that give testable results.
  2. Standard member DeepThought
    Losing the Thread
    18 Jul '14 15:35
    Originally posted by sonhouse
    http://phys.org/news/2014-07-universe.html

    These guys are making models that give testable results.
    The synthesis of this with one of Grampy Bobby's threads over in Spirituality leads me to the conclusion that the universe is a bubble of foam in God's beer. The end will come when he drinks it.
  3. Standard member sonhouse
    Fast and Curious
    18 Jul '14 15:45
    Originally posted by DeepThought
    The synthesis of this with one of Grampy Bobby's threads over in Spirituality leads me to the conclusion that the universe is a bubble of foam in God's beer. The end will come when he drinks it.
    Or it could be the foam from a huge universe sized horse peeing into the straw and when the foam all disappears into the straw it's all over

    But your hypothesis has a possible saving grace: When he pee's out the beer, new bubbles will come about when it hits the big tree he peed on

    So it could be a cyclic pee universe, a universe of one's peers
  4. Standard member DeepThought
    Losing the Thread
    19 Jul '14 01:07 / 1 edit
    Originally posted by sonhouse
    Or it could be the foam from a huge universe sized horse peeing into the straw and when the foam all disappears into the straw it's all over

    But your hypothesis has a possible saving grace: When he pee's out the beer, new bubbles will come about when it hits the big tree he peed on

    So it could be a cyclic pee universe, a universe of one's peers
    Eeuw, I'm hoping he has another beer.
  5. Standard member Soothfast
    0,1,1,2,3,5,8,13,21,
    19 Jul '14 05:33
    Originally posted by sonhouse
    Or it could be the foam from a huge universe sized horse peeing into the straw and when the foam all disappears into the straw it's all over

    But your hypothesis has a possible saving grace: When he pee's out the beer, new bubbles will come about when it hits the big tree he peed on

    So it could be a cyclic pee universe, a universe of one's peers
    The Big Wang Theory?
  6. 19 Jul '14 10:37
    Originally posted by Soothfast
    The Big Wang Theory?
    This made me laugh out loud.
  7. Standard member Soothfast
    0,1,1,2,3,5,8,13,21,
    21 Jul '14 00:05
    Originally posted by C Hess
    This made me laugh out loud.
    As well it should.
  8. 21 Jul '14 06:23
    Originally posted by sonhouse
    http://phys.org/news/2014-07-universe.html

    These guys are making models that give testable results.
    Well, I don't think so.

    We can speculate if our universe is the only one. But that's the only thing we can do.

    It's as easy (read: hard) to prove the existence of another universe as it is easy (read: hard) to prove the existence of a human soul. Both ideas are speculative. We just don't know enough about the laws of universe to neither confirm or rule out the possibility of another universe.

    This is too much of Star Trek for me...
  9. Standard member sonhouse
    Fast and Curious
    21 Jul '14 13:24
    Originally posted by FabianFnas
    Well, I don't think so.

    We can speculate if our universe is the only one. But that's the only thing we can do.

    It's as easy (read: hard) to prove the existence of another universe as it is easy (read: hard) to prove the existence of a human soul. Both ideas are speculative. We just don't know enough about the laws of universe to neither confirm or rule out the possibility of another universe.

    This is too much of Star Trek for me...
    Technology and science has a habit of advancing in the strangest places so don't count this out just yet. Look at string theory or its descendants like M Brane theory. Been around 40 odd years with nothing testable till maybe this year.

    I'd say, put it on the shelf till further evidence shows up but don't dismiss it out of hand.
  10. 22 Jul '14 08:15
    Originally posted by sonhouse
    Technology and science has a habit of advancing in the strangest places so don't count this out just yet. Look at string theory or its descendants like M Brane theory. Been around 40 odd years with nothing testable till maybe this year.

    I'd say, put it on the shelf till further evidence shows up but don't dismiss it out of hand.
    "Technology and science has a habit of advancing in the strangest places so don't count this out just yet."

    The same argument that I heard several pseudo-scientists said. "Well, of course there is a life after death, we have seen the seances from famous mediums so we know that there is something. Technology and science has a habit of advancing in the strangest places, so we just have to wait and see." Change the 'life after death' to anything pseudo and even you have heard it before.

    There are people who actually believes in the technology of Star Trek and Star Gate as it is the truth, and we just have to wait for the scientists to invent the gadgets...

    It would be nice with a multi-verse, exciting and cool, but how about understanding our own a bit better first...?
  11. Standard member sonhouse
    Fast and Curious
    22 Jul '14 11:37
    Originally posted by FabianFnas
    "Technology and science has a habit of advancing in the strangest places so don't count this out just yet."

    The same argument that I heard several pseudo-scientists said. "Well, of course there is a life after death, we have seen the seances from famous mediums so we know that there is something. Technology and science has a habit of advancing in the s ...[text shortened]... ith a multi-verse, exciting and cool, but how about understanding our own a bit better first...?
    Of course, like you say, it is all in the realm of science fiction but the more we learn about our own universe the easier it will be to figure out if indeed we live in a multiverse. What they are proposing is a way to test the possibilities, they are not saying they have any kind of definitive proof, just ways of reducing the possible alternative theories, perhaps their work will end up refuting the whole idea of multiverses. Time will tell. Cosmology is a relatively young science. Telescopes get more powerful all the time, ground based scopes now exceed Hubble in resolution and light gathering power and space borne telescopes get more powerful decade by decade. Always there is something new found.
  12. 22 Jul '14 12:49
    Originally posted by sonhouse
    Of course, like you say, it is all in the realm of science fiction but the more we learn about our own universe the easier it will be to figure out if indeed we live in a multiverse. What they are proposing is a way to test the possibilities, they are not saying they have any kind of definitive proof, just ways of reducing the possible alternative theories, ...[text shortened]... space borne telescopes get more powerful decade by decade. Always there is something new found.
    You're right. Of course you are. (No ironi) There is a slight chance that they come up with a verifiable test, even if I doubt it. But the step to a confirmative experiment is huge.

    A more interesting thing to know (IMHO) is how a pre-bangian universe of ours looked like, and if this was an one-time event, or a repetitive one. Or, the definite topology of our universe. Or the properties of the (so called) dark energy and dark matter. Or which of all M-theories are the correct one. Or... or...

    I was once a (minuscule) part of an experiment about 'tired light'. We didn't find anything. And I don't think we will ever find another universe either.

    I see the search of another universe as pseudo as any other pseudo science. But so was the search for the source of electricity once. They found it, and perhaps scientists will find another universe in yet another few hundred of years, who knows...
  13. Standard member DeepThought
    Losing the Thread
    22 Jul '14 15:19
    Originally posted by FabianFnas
    You're right. Of course you are. (No ironi) There is a slight chance that they come up with a verifiable test, even if I doubt it. But the step to a confirmative experiment is huge.

    A more interesting thing to know (IMHO) is how a pre-bangian universe of ours looked like, and if this was an one-time event, or a repetitive one. Or, the definite topology ...[text shortened]... perhaps scientists will find another universe in yet another few hundred of years, who knows...
    Imagine it's the medieval era and we are trying to determine whether the earth goes round the sun or vice versa. Also if the sun goes round the earth does it do that once a day or once a year. Until you work out the trick to determine that the earth rotates on its axis you can't answer the latter question. Someone would have been saying exactly what your are.

    Puzzle: What is the trick? How do you tell the earth spins on it's axis using medieval technology?
  14. 22 Jul '14 17:59
    Originally posted by DeepThought
    Imagine it's the medieval era and we are trying to determine whether the earth goes round the sun or vice versa. Also if the sun goes round the earth does it do that once a day or once a year. Until you work out the trick to determine that the earth rotates on its axis you can't answer the latter question. Someone would have been saying exactly what y ...[text shortened]... zle: What is the trick? How do you tell the earth spins on it's axis using medieval technology?
    I get your point.

    If you are told that the Earth is 6000 of age years only, and science can prove that fact is true. Would you give it another thought?
    Or if someone saying that he has invented perpetuum mobile?
    Or measured the mass of a soul?

    Do you get my point?
  15. Standard member sonhouse
    Fast and Curious
    23 Jul '14 10:29 / 1 edit
    Originally posted by DeepThought
    Imagine it's the medieval era and we are trying to determine whether the earth goes round the sun or vice versa. Also if the sun goes round the earth does it do that once a day or once a year. Until you work out the trick to determine that the earth rotates on its axis you can't answer the latter question. Someone would have been saying exactly what y ...[text shortened]... zle: What is the trick? How do you tell the earth spins on it's axis using medieval technology?
    I think they proved Earth spins on its axis with a pendulum since they knew a pendulum would swing back and forth in the same path forever unless some outside force was effecting it.

    Couldn't you even tell if you were at the north or south pole by the circularity of the swing? Wouldn't the swing be way different on the equator?