1. Joined
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    15 Mar '17 07:103 edits
    https://phys.org/news/2017-03-nanoscale-logic-machines-binary.html

    Not to be confused with a 'quantum computer' and I don't know where this is likely to go in practical implementation terms; we shall see.
  2. Subscribersonhouse
    Fast and Curious
    slatington, pa, usa
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    15 Mar '17 13:04
    Originally posted by humy
    https://phys.org/news/2017-03-nanoscale-logic-machines-binary.html

    Not to be confused with a 'quantum computer' and I don't know where this is likely to go in practical implementation terms; we shall see.
    So it's more like analog computing, Nanoanalog computer.
  3. Standard memberDeepThought
    Losing the Thread
    Cosmopolis
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    16 Mar '17 03:15
    Originally posted by humy
    https://phys.org/news/2017-03-nanoscale-logic-machines-binary.html

    Not to be confused with a 'quantum computer' and I don't know where this is likely to go in practical implementation terms; we shall see.
    When you say implementation, do you mean commercial production? If you mean what it can do it looks useful in any area where Monte-Carlo simulations are used. Lattice QCD, solid state physics, Markov Monte Carlo chains, I can think of all sorts of applications.
  4. Joined
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    16 Mar '17 07:03
    Originally posted by DeepThought
    When you say implementation, do you mean commercial production? If you mean what it can do it looks useful in any area where Monte-Carlo simulations are used. Lattice QCD, solid state physics, Markov Monte Carlo chains, I can think of all sorts of applications.
    I have Just looked up Monte-Carlo method;

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Monte_Carlo_method

    and I see what you mean.
  5. Joined
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    17 Mar '17 07:544 edits
    Originally posted by humy
    I have Just looked up Monte-Carlo method;

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Monte_Carlo_method

    and I see what you mean.
    I have just noticed I, without even knowing it, have used the Monte-Carlo method in MANY of both my many computer simulations and my computer programs I developed completely from scratch especially for my research. Until recently, I didn't even know that general method had a name. I have independently developed many variants of that Monte-Carlo method, some of which I intend to put in the book I will publish.

    -and then it suddenly occurred to me that the new kind of circuitry that uses quantum randomness could be used one day to massively boost my research, especially when my system of logic I developed from my research that I now call 'out logic' (I had called it 'tie logic' until I discovered an extremely subtle logical flaw in the 'tie axiom' it was based on but now I replaced that 'tie axiom' with the logically flawless 'defining-out principle' which leads to almost exactly the same system of logic thus renamed my logic 'out logic' ) is used for statistical analysis or in artificial intelligence.
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