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Science Forum

Science Forum

  1. Standard member sonhouse
    Fast and Curious
    29 Aug '13 22:01
    http://edition.cnn.com/2013/08/28/world/europe/new-chemical-element/index.html

    The periodic table just got a bit larger. I keep waiting for the next stable level, 118 and above.
  2. Standard member woodypusher
    misanthrope
    07 Sep '13 08:27
    Things sure have changed since I was a kid. There used to be less elements, more planets, less moons, only Saturn had rings, Diplodocus was the longest dinosaur, Brachiosaurus was the heaviest, Brontosaurus was real...hard to keep up
  3. 07 Sep '13 21:09 / 1 edit
    Since these superheavies decay so quickly, one cannot say that they have chemical properties or physical properties like melting point, density, conductivity or color. But can experts in quantum theory say theoretically what the properties of a chunk of pure element would be if only the nuclei were stable?
  4. Standard member woodypusher
    misanthrope
    08 Sep '13 05:29
    Originally posted by woodypusher
    Things sure have changed since I was a kid. There used to be less elements, more planets, less moons, only Saturn had rings, Diplodocus was the longest dinosaur, Brachiosaurus was the heaviest, Brontosaurus was real...hard to keep up
    *more planets in our solar system
  5. Standard member wolfgang59
    Infidel
    09 Sep '13 01:12
    Originally posted by woodypusher
    *more planets in our solar system
    A reference to Pluto's demotion methinks.
  6. Standard member sonhouse
    Fast and Curious
    09 Sep '13 07:58
    Originally posted by wolfgang59
    A reference to Pluto's demotion methinks.
    There is one out there, no atmosphere, called Eris.
  7. Standard member Soothfast
    0,1,1,2,3,5,8,13,21,
    11 Sep '13 05:58
    Originally posted by Paul Dirac II
    Since these superheavies decay so quickly, one cannot say that they have chemical properties or physical properties like melting point, density, conductivity or color. But can experts in quantum theory say theoretically what the properties of a chunk of pure element would be if only the nuclei were stable?
    The quantum model of the hydrogen atom is a truly complicated beast, though it involves only a single proton "orbited" by a single electron. Maybe someone can set me straight here, but I don't think physicists to this day have managed to work out the complete model of the next element in line, which is helium. And anyway a quantum model doesn't necessarily bear up when you have more than one atom of a given element present in a solid mass, so it will probably be useless in predicting melting temperatures under various atmospheric conditions.

    Science. It has gone so far, yet has so far to go...
  8. Subscriber Ponderableonline
    chemist
    11 Sep '13 13:38
    Originally posted by Soothfast
    The quantum model of the hydrogen atom is a truly complicated beast, though it involves only a single proton "orbited" by a single electron. Maybe someone can set me straight here, but I don't think physicists to this day have managed to work out the complete model of the next element in line, which is helium. And anyway a quantum model doesn't necessari ...[text shortened]... der various atmospheric conditions.

    Science. It has gone so far, yet has so far to go...
    In fact the Problem of the H2+ molecule is the most difficult entity yet described (nearly) perfectly by equations.

    The Problem is in the elctrons. Look up the "three Body Problem".

    But for metals we have a quite good Approximation of physical properties via a hypothetical grid and the electron gas Approximation.
  9. Standard member wolfgang59
    Infidel
    11 Sep '13 22:47 / 1 edit
    Originally posted by sonhouse
    There is one out there, no atmosphere, called Eris.
    Eris, Xena or Eric (as I like to call it) is about Pluto size and so sadly just another -oid.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MlrsqGal64w
    Perhaps Sonhouse you could change the lyrics to Eris the half a planet