1. Joined
    05 Feb '11
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    08 Oct '11 10:11
    http://www.nobelprize.org/nobel_prizes/chemistry/laureates/2011/press.html

    Amazing that his research group asked him to leave.
  2. Joined
    29 Dec '08
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    6788
    09 Oct '11 23:53
    Originally posted by shahenshah
    http://www.nobelprize.org/nobel_prizes/chemistry/laureates/2011/press.html

    Amazing that his research group asked him to leave.
    Actually rejection of new ideas doesn't surprise me; the turnaround to a Nobel being awarded within 30 years does.

    I remember a Physics lab in which our TA refused to accept my lab partner's and my observation that it took more force to start a little formica covered cube sliding, than it took to keep it sliding. It was easy to see, the spring we had in the string we pulled it with went longer, then shortened a bit while the block moved. He said it had to be experimental error. The two of us even named it something as if we'd be famous someday. Forgot the name.

    Still waiting for the Nobel.
  3. Joined
    31 May '06
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    10 Oct '11 00:00
    Originally posted by JS357
    Actually rejection of new ideas doesn't surprise me; the turnaround to a Nobel being awarded within 30 years does.

    I remember a Physics lab in which our TA refused to accept my lab partner's and my observation that it took more force to start a little formica covered cube sliding, than it took to keep it sliding. It was easy to see, the spring we had in the ...[text shortened]... d it something as if we'd be famous someday. Forgot the name.

    Still waiting for the Nobel.
    Really?

    That's odd because that's a known phenomena I learnt at A-level....

    Your TA didn't know what he was talking about.
  4. Subscribersonhouse
    Fast and Curious
    slatington, pa, usa
    Joined
    28 Dec '04
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    52619
    10 Oct '11 01:56
    Originally posted by googlefudge
    Really?

    That's odd because that's a known phenomena I learnt at A-level....

    Your TA didn't know what he was talking about.
    Well you must know what TA stands for? Total Ashole....
  5. Joined
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    10 Oct '11 04:34
    Originally posted by sonhouse
    Well you must know what TA stands for? Total Ashole....
    Some of them really are! 🙂
  6. Joined
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    6788
    10 Oct '11 04:481 edit
    Originally posted by googlefudge
    Really?

    That's odd because that's a known phenomena I learnt at A-level....

    Your TA didn't know what he was talking about.
    Now I remember, we named it the Blending Phenomenon!

    And a few years later, I was a TA. Heh heh.
  7. Joined
    06 Aug '06
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    1945
    11 Oct '11 06:09
    Originally posted by googlefudge
    Really?

    That's odd because that's a known phenomena I learnt at A-level....

    Your TA didn't know what he was talking about.
    Yes, don't see what's strange about it. First static friction has to be overcome before an object will start moving along a surface, after that kinetic friction to keep it moving. Not sure what the exact coefficients for the two would be for formica (and whatever surface you were moving it along), but static friction being the greater of the two is quite normal.
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