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Science Forum

  1. Subscriber Crowley
    Not Aleister
    06 Oct '08 14:32
    Will you be seeing much more activity now?

    http://antwrp.gsfc.nasa.gov/apod/image/0810/304erupt_rt_crop1024_med.mov
  2. 06 Oct '08 22:52
    Originally posted by Crowley
    Will you be seeing much more activity now?

    http://antwrp.gsfc.nasa.gov/apod/image/0810/304erupt_rt_crop1024_med.mov
    That's beautiful. Unfortunately this wasn't fired in our direction, so it didn't help for the aurora. There isn't much happening; we are still deeply in the solar minimum.
  3. 08 Oct '08 03:57
    Originally posted by Nordlys
    That's beautiful. Unfortunately this wasn't fired in our direction, so it didn't help for the aurora. There isn't much happening; we are still deeply in the solar minimum.
    Would it be safe to say that the northern lights are produced by electrons attracted to the earth's North pole (actually has a + charge) and the southern lights are produced by protons attracted to the earth's South pole (- charge)?
  4. 08 Oct '08 04:53
    Originally posted by mlprior
    Would it be safe to say that the northern lights are produced by electrons attracted to the earth's North pole (actually has a + charge) and the southern lights are produced by protons attracted to the earth's South pole (- charge)?
    Doesn't seem to be right to me...
  5. 08 Oct '08 10:16
    Originally posted by mlprior
    Would it be safe to say that the northern lights are produced by electrons attracted to the earth's North pole (actually has a + charge) and the southern lights are produced by protons attracted to the earth's South pole (- charge)?
    I guess it would be safe to say (i.e. you probably won't be persecuted, shot or hung for it), but it isn't correct. The aurora borealis (the Northern lights) and the aurora australis (the Southern lights) are produced in the same way (and in fact they are almost mirror images of each other). I am no physicist and never got very deeply into the physics of the aurora, so I'll leave the explanations to more knowledgeable people: http://www.imv.uit.no/english/science/publicat/waynorth/wn1/contents.htm (4. and 5. are the most relevant parts in this context).
  6. 14 Oct '08 22:39
    Originally posted by mlprior
    Would it be safe to say that the northern lights are produced by electrons attracted to the earth's North pole (actually has a + charge) and the southern lights are produced by protons attracted to the earth's South pole (- charge)?
    magnetic fields are caused by moving charge, and any moving charge whether positive or negative will create magnetic lines of force which could be viewed as north and south. so it is not correct to consider a north pole or a south pole as having a particular electric charge.