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Science Forum

  1. Standard member sonhouse
    Fast and Curious
    05 Feb '17 16:12
    ttps://phys.org/news/2017-02-flipping-ammonia-production-electricity-consuming.html
  2. 05 Feb '17 16:29
    Certainly good news if they can scale it up.
    Although it does beg the question as to why the traditional process consumes energy. Chemical reactions have a net energy which is constant whatever method is used. So my guess is the traditional method either has waste byproducts or is careless about heat.
  3. Standard member sonhouse
    Fast and Curious
    06 Feb '17 02:36
    Originally posted by twhitehead
    Certainly good news if they can scale it up.
    Although it does beg the question as to why the traditional process consumes energy. Chemical reactions have a net energy which is constant whatever method is used. So my guess is the traditional method either has waste byproducts or is careless about heat.
    They said it produces a 'small' amount of electricity. I wonder what that means in terms of watt hours or voltage and current? But it is a small lab result so my guess is it will scale ok.
  4. 06 Feb '17 07:40
    Originally posted by sonhouse
    But it is a small lab result so my guess is it will scale ok.
    Huh? Your not making sense. Whether something scales well depends on things like the costs of the materials used and the through put speed of the process.
  5. 06 Feb '17 07:43 / 1 edit
    I see from Wikipedia that the overall reaction does produce energy but the current method is very inefficient and has to be repeated over and over with various gasses being extracted etc. It is the high pressures that takes all the energy.


    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Haber_process
  6. Standard member sonhouse
    Fast and Curious
    06 Feb '17 09:04
    Originally posted by twhitehead
    I see from Wikipedia that the overall reaction does produce energy but the current method is very inefficient and has to be repeated over and over with various gasses being extracted etc. It is the high pressures that takes all the energy.


    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Haber_process
    Wonder if that can be improved on?
  7. 06 Feb '17 09:29
    Originally posted by sonhouse
    Wonder if that can be improved on?
    Well the article from the OP suggests they have found a way to do it without the high pressures, what remains to be seen is whether their solution scales to industrial requirements without excessive costs.