1. Joined
    26 May '08
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    2120
    23 Mar '11 11:22
    I have been searching the web to try and find out how about the latest research on non-metallic magnets is progressing but have got nowhere and I have given up.

    Is the non-metallic magnets (I am only talking about the ones that work at room temperature) with the strongest magnetism made to date (or at least could be made in theory) anything as magnetic as, say, the best iron magnets?
    I mean, how does the strength of the magnetic field around the best non-metallic magnets compare with the best iron-based magnets in terms of weight-per-magnetic strength and volume-per-magnetic strength?
    What is the theoretical limit (if any) on how strong a magnetic field can be around a non-metallic magnets that works at room temperature?
    I just hope somebody here knows or can point to some relevant web links.
  2. Germany
    Joined
    27 Oct '08
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    3089
    23 Mar '11 12:21
    Are you talking about permanent magnets (in that case, I don't know)? In practise, the strongest magnets are often made using superconductors, because these don't generate any heat (no resistance) so you can pump huge currents through them to create strong magnets.
  3. Joined
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    23 Mar '11 17:561 edit
    Originally posted by KazetNagorra
    Are you talking about permanent magnets (in that case, I don't know)? In practise, the strongest magnets are often made using superconductors, because these don't generate any heat (no resistance) so you can pump huge currents through them to create strong magnets.
    I am partly talking about permanent magnets but I would also be interested in non-permanent non-metallic magnets as the would still be very useful as electromagnets in electric motors and electric generators.

    The non-metallic magnets I am talking about here are specifically the ones that work at room temperature so that rules out superconductor ones (at least for now).
    There have recently been invented plastic and polymer based magnets that work at room temperature but I have been completely unable to find any details of the strength of their magnetism as compared with conventional metallic magnets and it is this that I want to know about.
  4. Subscribersonhouse
    Fast and Curious
    slatington, pa, usa
    Joined
    28 Dec '04
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    52619
    23 Mar '11 19:39
    Originally posted by Andrew Hamilton
    I am partly talking about permanent magnets but I would also be interested in non-permanent non-metallic magnets as the would still be very useful as electromagnets in electric motors and electric generators.

    The non-metallic magnets I am talking about here are specifically the ones that work at room temperature so that rules out superconductor on ...[text shortened]... gnetism as compared with conventional metallic magnets and it is this that I want to know about.
    I found this using google, Plastic magnets:

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Plastic_magnet

    They also talk about a poly magnet that gets something like twice as strong when hit with blue light! That's a new one for me. Must be lots of things you could make with that!
  5. Joined
    26 May '08
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    2120
    24 Mar '11 18:231 edit
    Originally posted by sonhouse
    I found this using google, Plastic magnets:

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Plastic_magnet

    They also talk about a poly magnet that gets something like twice as strong when hit with blue light! That's a new one for me. Must be lots of things you could make with that!
    Thanks 🙂
    That was the first link I looked at from my search.
    It is interesting.
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