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Science Forum

  1. Standard member sonhouse
    Fast and Curious
    06 Jul '16 10:48
    http://www.zmescience.com/medicine/regenerate-teeth-no-fillings/

    A great development!
  2. 06 Jul '16 17:38
    Originally posted by sonhouse
    http://www.zmescience.com/medicine/regenerate-teeth-no-fillings/

    A great development!
    Rabbits have teeth that keep growing, so they need to chew things to wear down their teeth.
  3. Standard member sonhouse
    Fast and Curious
    07 Jul '16 04:49
    Originally posted by Duchess64
    Rabbits have teeth that keep growing, so they need to chew things to wear down their teeth.
    Rodentia do but it doesn't help humans much till this development. Maybe in another 30 years fillings will be a thing of the past world wide. Clean out a cavity, instill in it the tooth stem cells and wait for a few weeks while the tooth rebuilds itself.
  4. 07 Jul '16 18:16 / 1 edit
    Originally posted by sonhouse
    Rodentia do but it doesn't help humans much till this development. Maybe in another 30 years fillings will be a thing of the past world wide.
    Clean out a cavity, instill in it the tooth stem cells and wait for a few weeks while the tooth rebuilds itself.
    Rabbits are *not* rodents. Along with hares and pikas, they belong to the order Lagomorpha.
    One of the major differences between lagomorphs and rodents is the teeth.
    It's true, however, that rodents also have continuously growing teeth.
  5. Standard member sonhouse
    Fast and Curious
    07 Jul '16 20:22
    Originally posted by Duchess64
    Rabbits are *not* rodents. Along with hares and pikas, they belong to the order Lagomorpha.
    One of the major differences between lagomorphs and rodents is the teeth.
    It's true, however, that rodents also have continuously growing teeth.
    Yes, I see that now Nice read about them on wiki. Thanks for pointing that out.
  6. 08 Jul '16 18:54 / 1 edit
    Originally posted by Duchess64
    Rabbits are *not* rodents. Along with hares and pikas, they belong to the order Lagomorpha.
    One of the major differences between lagomorphs and rodents is the teeth.
    It's true, however, that rodents also have continuously growing teeth.
    The popular belief that rabbits are most closely related to rodents may be incorrect.

    Dan Gruar, an Israeli scientist who has written _Fundamentals of Molecular Evolution_
    and now is a professor at the University of Houston, wrote a study in 'Nature' that
    concluded that, according to DNA analysis, lagomorphs are much more closely related
    to primates than to rodents. Indeed, he believed that primates are more closely related
    to lagomorphs than to any other order except Scandentia (which includes tree shrews).

    The evolutionary history of lagomorphs is still not that well-understood. Most people
    would be surprised to learn that, according to Dan Gruar, a rabbit is more closely
    related to them than to a squirrel in terms of DNA.
  7. Standard member sonhouse
    Fast and Curious
    09 Jul '16 19:09
    Originally posted by Duchess64
    The popular belief that rabbits are most closely related to rodents may be incorrect.

    Dan Gruar, an Israeli scientist who has written _Fundamentals of Molecular Evolution_
    and now is a professor at the University of Houston, wrote a study in 'Nature' that
    concluded that, according to DNA analysis, lagomorphs are much more closely related
    to primates ...[text shortened]... ing to Dan Gruar, a rabbit is more closely
    related to them than to a squirrel in terms of DNA.
    That would be an interesting field to study. But the deep past doesn't have much DNA to match, unless we found an early version of a rabbit inside amber which is unlikely since they could get out of such a trap easily.