1. Joined
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    05 Dec '14 10:481 edit
    http://phys.org/news/2014-12-superconductivity-cooling.html
    "...With the aid of short infrared laser pulses, researchers have succeeded for the first time in making a ceramic superconducting at room temperature – albeit for only a few millionths of a microsecond.
    ..."

    "a few millionths of a microsecond" translates into just a few pecoseconds which isn't long! But, still, I find the fact that they achieved room temperature superconductivity for pecoseconds intriguing for it at least proves that room temperature superconductivity is possible albeit only for extremely short time periods and this begs the billion dollar question; is there a way to design a superconductor that can maintain that room temperature superconductivity indefinitely?
  2. Subscribersonhouse
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    05 Dec '14 11:031 edit
    Originally posted by humy
    http://phys.org/news/2014-12-superconductivity-cooling.html
    "...With the aid of short infrared laser pulses, researchers have succeeded for the first time in making a ceramic superconducting at room temperature – albeit for only a few millionths of a microsecond.
    ..."

    "a few millionths of a microsecond" translates into just a few pecoseconds which isn't lo ...[text shortened]... design a superconductor that can maintain that room temperature superconductivity indefinitely?
    Ah, you beat me to it! I thought it read microseconds which is why I named my post that. At the picosecond level, the electrons would move maximum 300 microns, that is a good bit of distance at the atomic level. That amounts to about 3 million Angstroms, or about 1 million or so atom widths so it is still significant.
  3. Cape Town
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    05 Dec '14 11:27
    Originally posted by sonhouse
    Ah, you beat me to it!
    He beat you by a factor of a thousand!

    If the laser is repeatedly fired every few milliseconds, will the super conductivity be enough to take advantage of some superconducting effects?
  4. Subscribersonhouse
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    05 Dec '14 13:31
    Originally posted by twhitehead
    He beat you by a factor of a thousand!

    If the laser is repeatedly fired every few milliseconds, will the super conductivity be enough to take advantage of some superconducting effects?
    Yep, I acknowledged that also🙂 I analyzed how far the electrons would go assuming they were going at c and it was quite a distance so there were quite a number of atoms involved, 300 microns travel length and several million angstroms, that covers a lot of molecules. So even pico seconds is important.
  5. Joined
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    05 Dec '14 23:022 edits
    Originally posted by sonhouse
    Yep, I acknowledged that also🙂 I analyzed how far the electrons would go assuming they were going at c and it was quite a distance so there were quite a number of atoms involved, 300 microns travel length and several million angstroms, that covers a lot of molecules. So even pico seconds is important.
    300 microns travel length ...


    A square shaped area of 300 microns diagonally corner to corner is about 212 by 212 microns.
    Taking the Apple A8 microprocessor as typical modern one; that has about 2,000,000,000 transistors and an area of 89mm2 ( see http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Transistor_count ) which works out as slightly over one million ( ~1,009,891 to be more accelerate ) transistors per 212 by 212 microns area of microchip. So, with that 300 microns travel length, that might be enough to allow a microcircuit with a practical maximum of very roughly one million transistors ( plus wires ) to process data without having to store in memory intermediate results within a single computer clock cycle ( I hope I got that all both conceptually and mathematically correct )
  6. Subscribersonhouse
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    06 Dec '14 02:16
    Originally posted by humy
    300 microns travel length ...


    A square shaped area of 300 microns diagonally corner to corner is about 212 by 212 microns.
    Taking the Apple A8 microprocessor as typical modern one; that has about 2,000,000,000 transistors and an area of 89mm2 ( see http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Transistor_count ) which works out as slightly over one mil ...[text shortened]... ngle computer clock cycle ( I hope I got that all both conceptually and mathematically correct )
    Don't forget the pulsing laser that has to be the heartbeat of the system to keep up the super stuff.....
  7. Germany
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    06 Dec '14 08:27
    It's not really "room temperature" if it's a non-equilibrium effect.
  8. Subscribersonhouse
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    06 Dec '14 13:34
    Originally posted by KazetNagorra
    It's not really "room temperature" if it's a non-equilibrium effect.
    As far as I can see, it is just a tool to study exotic superconductivity effects. I hope it leads to something real. As does every one else for sure.
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