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Science Forum

  1. Standard member sonhouse
    Fast and Curious
    12 Dec '15 14:20
    http://phys.org/news/2015-12-scientists-reveal-rotation-earth-core.html

    Seems there is a change in the Earth's rotation rate on the surface when Glaciers melts and the weight of the water goes towards the equator, and like a spinning skater, when you have your arms outstretched and bring them inwards your body spin rate speeds up.

    Same thing happens to Earth. The water at the poles in the form of ice is rotating relatively slowly compared to the equator. So when the water melts and goes to towards the equator, the earth's rotation rate speeds up.

    But not the core. Therein lies the difficulty.

    This guy is studying the results of the spinning Earth and the changes in the spin rate and the change in the spin rate of the core.

    Obviously, if the core and the surface rotate at the same rate, things are smooth.

    If they are different, then mantle movement can take place, causing among other things, earthquakes, volcanism and so forth and he is saying, also sea level rise.
  2. 12 Dec '15 15:52
    Originally posted by sonhouse
    So when the water melts and goes to towards the equator, the earth's rotation rate speeds up.
    Actually, it slows down.

    Obviously, if the core and the surface rotate at the same rate, things are smooth.
    They do not (and never have) rotate at the same rate.

    If they are different, then mantle movement can take place, causing among other things, earthquakes, volcanism and so forth
    That is actually more to do with convection currents than rotation - although they are interrelated.

    and he is saying, also sea level rise.
    Not quite that simple. He said we can better predict sea level rise. A slower rotating earth should experience sea level rise at the poles and sea level drop at the equator.
  3. 13 Dec '15 01:09
    Originally posted by twhitehead
    and he is saying, also sea level rise.
    Not quite that simple. He said we can better predict sea level rise. A slower rotating earth should experience sea level rise at the poles and sea level drop at the equator.
    Although a bigger effect would be the loss of mass at the poles leading to a lower gravitational
    pull causing sea level falls at the poles and a rise nearer the equator [kinda].
  4. Standard member sonhouse
    Fast and Curious
    13 Dec '15 20:49
    Originally posted by googlefudge
    Although a bigger effect would be the loss of mass at the poles leading to a lower gravitational
    pull causing sea level falls at the poles and a rise nearer the equator [kinda].
    But as far as I can see, it is a new result and should be helpful figuring out the rise of sea level.