1. Joined
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    25 Sep '13 23:43
    I'm trying to go back to basics on science, to physics, chemistry, and biology at GCSE (High School) level to begin with, and building up from there. Reason being I've forgotten most of what I learnt at school. My goal is to achieve perfection or close to it with the fundamental facts, techniques, language and so on so I can always build on solid foundations.

    I've got reasonably up-to-date textbooks, and I can access some interesting areas locally for the study of biology. I'd like to know if anyone has any advice on things to 'spice up' my study, such as fun experiments, interesting things to observe and so on?

    About my level if this helps: although I've forgotten a lot, I was pretty strong in scientific subjects and do keep up with some science news and watch/listen to documentaries frequently. I also have outstanding computer skills. So this is partly about revision, but as I've been 20 years (give or take) out of science education, and did a lot of misbehaving (with the attendant opportunity cost of failing to learn course material thoroughly), and have suffered from debilitating illness, it will almost feel like learning things fresh, with a nagging sense of déja vu.

    I'm self-studying because I lack the funds to pay for courses, so I will not have the benefit of labs with bunsen burners and chemicals, for example, and especially I will be without the benefit of group learning, which I think is especially important in science. However, I'm well motivated and resourceful so I hope to overcome these difficulties any way I can.

    The time I can afford to devote will vary. I might be able to put in intensive days or weeks sometimes, but these will be the exception rather than the rule. I guess I can put in about 8 hours per week of textbook learning, but additionally I should have time for some brief practical work (work that will "keep" is ideal).
  2. Subscribersonhouse
    Fast and Curious
    slatington, pa, usa
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    26 Sep '13 00:421 edit
    Originally posted by NoEarthlyReason
    I'm trying to go back to basics on science, to physics, chemistry, and biology at GCSE (High School) level to begin with, and building up from there. Reason being I've forgotten most of what I learnt at school. My goal is to achieve perfection or close to it with the fundamental facts, techniques, language and so on so I can always build on solid fou ...[text shortened]... additionally I should have time for some brief practical work (work that will "keep" is ideal).
    There are free online science courses available now, here is one example:

    http://www.hoagiesgifted.org/online_hs.htm

    And this, a LIBRARY of free online courses:

    http://www.montereyinstitute.org/nroc/nrocdemos.html

    Knock em dead! Good luck!
  3. Standard memberRJHinds
    The Near Genius
    Fort Gordon
    Joined
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    26 Sep '13 00:56
    Originally posted by NoEarthlyReason
    I'm trying to go back to basics on science, to physics, chemistry, and biology at GCSE (High School) level to begin with, and building up from there. Reason being I've forgotten most of what I learnt at school. My goal is to achieve perfection or close to it with the fundamental facts, techniques, language and so on so I can always build on solid fou ...[text shortened]... additionally I should have time for some brief practical work (work that will "keep" is ideal).
    You can find a lot of science information on the internet. You can use Google.com to search for any subject you want. YouTube.com is a good source for videos on about any subject and you will find information on both sides of controversial issues and various theories in science.

    The Instructor
  4. Joined
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    26 Sep '13 01:08
    Originally posted by RJHinds
    You can find a lot of science information on the internet. You can use Google.com to search for any subject you want. YouTube.com is a good source for videos on about any subject and you will find information on both sides of controversial issues and various theories in science.

    The Instructor
    Thanks. However, without wishing to sound like I don't appreciate your undoubtedly kind effort, I think you should know for future reference that you can safely assume that anyone competent enough to post on the rhp forums (actually, pretty much any human being under the age of 40 or more) knows this already. I did say I have outstanding computer skills 😉. In fact, while the Google search engine is undeniably a useful tool if used skilfully, I would say that YouTube quite a poor research tool, in no small part due to the foisting on the user of popular videos, but also that videos posted by "anyone and everyone", so to speak, lack quality control by definition.
  5. Joined
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    26 Sep '13 01:09
    Originally posted by sonhouse
    There are free online science courses available now, here is one example:

    http://www.hoagiesgifted.org/online_hs.htm

    And this, a LIBRARY of free online courses:

    http://www.montereyinstitute.org/nroc/nrocdemos.html

    Knock em dead! Good luck!
    Thanks sonhouse, I'll have a look at these, hopefully tomorrow.
  6. Joined
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    26 Sep '13 08:122 edits
    Originally posted by NoEarthlyReason
    Thanks. However, without wishing to sound like I don't appreciate your undoubtedly kind effort, I think you should know for future reference that you can safely assume that anyone competent enough to post on the rhp forums (actually, pretty much any human being under the age of 40 or more) knows this already. I did say I have outstanding computer ski ...[text shortened]... so that videos posted by "anyone and everyone", so to speak, lack quality control by definition.
    RJHinds is the LAST person in the world you would want to listen to for any advice about learning science for that is an extremely bad joke!
    He has no scientific credentials and yet trolls here with a high opinion of himself making out he knows about science better than all scientists here and elsewhere, including better than Einstein, when he has repeatedly demonstrated here he does,t understand even the simplest scientific concepts or even basic logic!

    He is just here to push his religious agenda because he has been brainwashed to believe a load of stupid religious crap and has NEVER had any genuine interest in science.

    The advice he would really want to give is to read the Bible and pray! -because he doesn't want you to know anything about real science because real science disproves his absurd religious beliefs such as the Earth is just a few thousand years old!
    He wants you to be ignorant like he has made himself!
  7. Joined
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    26 Sep '13 10:271 edit
    Originally posted by humy
    RJHinds is the LAST person in the world you would want to listen to for any advice about learning science for that is an extremely bad joke!
    He has no scientific credentials and yet trolls here with a high opinion of himself making out he knows about science better than all scientists here and elsewhere, including better than Einstein, when he has repeatedly d ...[text shortened]... Earth is just a few thousand years old!
    He wants you to be ignorant like he has made himself!
    I have nothing against reading the Bible and praying. In fact I think the Bible is an extraordinary book. I disagree with creationism because I have taken the trouble to pay attention in school at least some of the time, and keenly follow the landmark natural history documentaries. I think there was a brief moment during my childhood when I believed the Book of Genesis' version of the creation of the world, but it is far more rewarding in life to open one's mind to science, the arts and humanities, if one has the capability. I don't think that trolling on a science forum, especially with such determination, is a Christian thing to do, and I wonder if Mr Hinds has lost his faith but is denying it to himself. I asked him what denomination he was be he seemed unable or unwilling to reply.
  8. Cape Town
    Joined
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    26 Sep '13 14:191 edit
    Originally posted by NoEarthlyReason
    I would say that YouTube quite a poor research tool, in no small part due to the foisting on the user of popular videos, but also that videos posted by "anyone and everyone", so to speak, lack quality control by definition.
    As with the rest of the internet, its up to the user to know quality when you see it. But that is no reason to dismiss the internet or youtube. If you take the trouble to look on youtube you will find a lot that can help you.
    There are plenty of free university courses, and many of them host thier videos on youtube.

    Its not clear from your OP if you are learning for fun, or if you want to get some sort of certification out of it. If you are learning for fun, then its nice to skip ahead to university type stuff then only go back to GCSE if you meet something you need to brush up on.

    Yale has some nice free courses:
    http://oyc.yale.edu/courses

    I also recommend Coursera:
    https://www.coursera.org/

    You can even find free courses that are willing to give you certificates etc if you put in the work.
  9. Cape Town
    Joined
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    26 Sep '13 14:27
    I forgot to mention:

    https://www.khanacademy.org/
  10. Subscribersonhouse
    Fast and Curious
    slatington, pa, usa
    Joined
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    26 Sep '13 14:41
    Originally posted by twhitehead
    I forgot to mention:

    https://www.khanacademy.org/
    I was trying to remember the name of that one. I think it is making waves, getting all kinds of awards and seed money from people like Bill Gates.
  11. Standard memberRJHinds
    The Near Genius
    Fort Gordon
    Joined
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    27 Sep '13 02:071 edit
    Originally posted by NoEarthlyReason
    I have nothing against reading the Bible and praying. In fact I think the Bible is an extraordinary book. I disagree with creationism because I have taken the trouble to pay attention in school at least some of the time, and keenly follow the landmark natural history documentaries. I think there was a brief moment during my childhood when I believed ...[text shortened]... g it to himself. I asked him what denomination he was be he seemed unable or unwilling to reply.
    If you are really that interested, I will explain that I was baptized in a Southern Baptist Church in my home town of Tyler, Texas. But I consider myself just a Christian and do not toot the denominational aspects, because I have spent twenty years in the military and traveled and attended many different denominational and non-denominational churches. But technically, I am Baptist. I can't say that I agree with any one group completely.

    The Instructor
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