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Science Forum

  1. Standard member sonhouse
    Fast and Curious
    02 Feb '10 13:52
    http://www.physorg.com/news184310039.html

    Invented in Turkey, it will change everything due to its stain, bug, and UV resistance. It is a layer of real glass but extremely flexible and only about 30 or 40 atoms thick so medical instruments stay bacteria free because they cannot stick to the surface. Hospitals can spray the stuff and keep down MRSA kind of infections off any surface.

    They said supermarkets will not want this product in their isles because it would almost eliminate the need for the massive cleaning supply industry since you won't need to sterilize things with strong bleach any more, just a hot water rinse and that industry will not take to such a product because the anti-bacterial properties lasts for months, not something they want to hear since they like the resale nature of bleach and other soap products.

    They mentioned this coating, invisible to the naked eye, could be put on clothes and make stain resistance a sure thing, like getting red wine thrown on your shirt and it would just rinse off, try that with regular coatings!
  2. Standard member Palynka
    Upward Spiral
    02 Feb '10 13:58
    That looks amazing. It could also be a great ecological breakthrough if it vastly decreases the amount of detergents/cleaning products used.
  3. Standard member sonhouse
    Fast and Curious
    02 Feb '10 20:39
    Originally posted by Palynka
    That looks amazing. It could also be a great ecological breakthrough if it vastly decreases the amount of detergents/cleaning products used.
    I can see a BIG lobby effort to kill such a thing by the detergent interests. They talk about coating clothes for instance which would clearly mean a big reduction of detergents or maybe elimination entirely, using only water to clean, the detergent dudes
    would clearly be unhappy, no matter how much such a development would improve the environment. Obviously it would not totally kill the need for soap and such, especially for the human and pet bodies but the clothing industry, wow, they would be totally pisssed!
  4. Standard member PBE6
    Bananarama
    02 Feb '10 21:52
    Interesting to see all the comments about health/safety issues. I really doubt that this sprayed-on glass compound would mimic asbestos in any way, considering the fibrous nature of asbestos and how unlikely it would be that these glass particles would flake off in long chains, but it's always a good idea to research health impacts of any chemicals associated with food, clothing or other consumer goods.

    I have a sneaking suspicion that this material (or something very similar) is already is use with no ill-effects being attributed to it:

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Liquid_glass
  5. 03 Feb '10 11:32
    Originally posted by sonhouse
    I can see a BIG lobby effort to kill such a thing by the detergent interests. They talk about coating clothes for instance which would clearly mean a big reduction of detergents or maybe elimination entirely, using only water to clean, the detergent dudes
    would clearly be unhappy, no matter how much such a development would improve the environment. Obvious ...[text shortened]... ally for the human and pet bodies but the clothing industry, wow, they would be totally pisssed!
    Sure... but there would also be plenty of industries which use detergents etc. now, and they will be keen to use this kind of technology because it could save them money. I don't think a lobby can stop a development like this if it is as good as it sounds.
  6. 03 Feb '10 14:02
    Originally posted by KazetNagorra
    I don't think a lobby can stop a development like this if it is as good as it sounds.
    It depends how big the lobby is, and which political system it is running under.
    The lobby against electric cars in the US was remarkably successful despite the enormous benefits.
  7. Standard member sonhouse
    Fast and Curious
    03 Feb '10 19:52
    Originally posted by twhitehead
    It depends how big the lobby is, and which political system it is running under.
    The lobby against electric cars in the US was remarkably successful despite the enormous benefits.
    Look up the trolley car conspiracy in Los Angeles USA in the 1950's. They did a lobby # by a conspiracy between Firestone Tire and Rubber, Detroit auto firms and the fuel companies, drove out a very efficient electric trolley system in LA and substituted diesel powered busses, Lo and behold, Firestone won, Detroit won ( have to build all those new busses) and the fuel companies won, now all that diesel goes through the busses and right into downtown Los Angeles. What a great plan.
  8. 05 Feb '10 12:51 / 1 edit
    Originally posted by twhitehead
    It depends how big the lobby is, and which political system it is running under.
    The lobby against electric cars in the US was remarkably successful despite the enormous benefits.
    Yes, but carmakers are few and initial investment for selling cars profitably is very high. This is in contrast to a material that could be used by many different industries with small cost. You can't lobby away things like drugs or prostitution either, because they are controlled by small scale producers with low investment cost.