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  1. Standard member adam warlock
    Baby Gauss
    12 May '10 00:38
    http://www.physorg.com/news192811164.html

    An ungrad student was making a study that would compare sources of x-rays with the positions of galaxies when she discovered something that made the community of astronomers to raise their collective eyebrows: Supermassive black holes were, apparently, expelled by the center of a galaxy!
    The initial suspicion is that this event was cause by the collision of two smaller black holes.

    For a previous discussion on the nature of black hole collision (and some more links about the difficulties in computing this) just visit this heated thread: Thread 117923

    For the prepint of the article: http://arxiv.org/abs/1004.5379
  2. Standard member sonhouse
    Fast and Curious
    12 May '10 11:59
    Originally posted by adam warlock
    http://www.physorg.com/news192811164.html

    An ungrad student was making a study that would compare sources of x-rays with the positions of galaxies when she discovered something that made the community of astronomers to raise their collective eyebrows: Supermassive black holes were, apparently, expelled by the center of a galaxy!
    The initial suspicio ...[text shortened]... d: Thread 117923

    For the prepint of the article: http://arxiv.org/abs/1004.5379
    Can't even imagine the force needed to do that, considering the mass would be millions of suns, you would think the black hole would stay put and whatever pushed against it would bounce.
  3. 12 May '10 17:29
    Originally posted by sonhouse
    Can't even imagine the force needed to do that, considering the mass would be millions of suns, you would think the black hole would stay put and whatever pushed against it would bounce.
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gravity_assist

    In orbital mechanics and aerospace engineering, a gravitational slingshot, gravity assist maneuver or swing-by is the use of the relative movement and gravity of a planet or other celestial body to alter the path and speed of a spacecraft, typically in order to save propellant, time, and expense. Gravity assistance can be used to accelerate, decelerate and/or re-direct the path of a spacecraft.
    The "assist" is provided by the motion (orbital angular momentum) of the gravitating body as it pulls on the spacecraft.[1]
  4. Standard member sonhouse
    Fast and Curious
    14 May '10 20:42
    Originally posted by zeeblebot
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gravity_assist

    In orbital mechanics and aerospace engineering, a gravitational slingshot, gravity assist maneuver or swing-by is the use of the relative movement and gravity of a planet or other celestial body to alter the path and speed of a spacecraft, typically in order to save propellant, time, and expense. Gravity assis ...[text shortened]... he motion (orbital angular momentum) of the gravitating body as it pulls on the spacecraft.[1]
    Sure but I was thinking of the massive amount of energy required to sling a what, billion sun mass, to 400,000 m/second I think was mentioned. Moggles the bind.
    I guess it is a strict exchange of kinetic energy, so there must be something even more massive it is slinging against.
  5. Standard member adam warlock
    Baby Gauss
    14 May '10 20:57
    Originally posted by sonhouse
    Can't even imagine the force needed to do that, considering the mass would be millions of suns, you would think the black hole would stay put and whatever pushed against it would bounce.
    Black holes collisions are a very messy game! I think I can safely say no one understands how this came to be.
  6. Standard member avalanchethecat
    Not actually a cat
    14 May '10 21:05
    Originally posted by adam warlock
    I think I can safely say no one understands how this came to be.
    Gods playing marbles.
  7. Standard member adam warlock
    Baby Gauss
    14 May '10 21:36
    Originally posted by avalanchethecat
    Gods playing marbles.
    That explains how he lost them in the first place...
  8. 14 May '10 23:37
    Originally posted by sonhouse
    Sure but I was thinking of the massive amount of energy required to sling a what, billion sun mass, to 400,000 m/second I think was mentioned. Moggles the bind.
    I guess it is a strict exchange of kinetic energy, so there must be something even more massive it is slinging against.
    yeah, even with man-made vehicles vs. planets there is an exchange, it's just that the planet is so large the amount of energy it loses is relatively tiny. with black holes, what else are they going to do if they don't collide?
  9. 15 May '10 00:10
    Originally posted by adam warlock
    http://www.physorg.com/news192811164.html

    An ungrad student was making a study that would compare sources of x-rays with the positions of galaxies when she discovered something that made the community of astronomers to raise their collective eyebrows: Supermassive black holes were, apparently, expelled by the center of a galaxy!
    The initial suspicio ...[text shortened]... d: Thread 117923

    For the prepint of the article: http://arxiv.org/abs/1004.5379
    http://news.nationalgeographic.com/news/2010/05/100507-science-space-black-holes-supernova-mystery/

    Mystery Space Object May Be Ejected Black Hole

    John Roach

    for National Geographic News

    Published May 7, 2010

    A mystery object in a galaxy far, far away could be a supermassive black hole that got booted from its home galaxy's center, according to a new study.

    Then again, the strange body could be a rare type of supernova or an oddball "midsize" black hole—more massive than black holes born when single stars explode but "lighter" than the supermassive ones at the centers of galaxies.

    "All three of those [options] are exotic and have something peculiar to them," said study co-author Peter Jonker, an astronomer with the Netherlands Institute for Space Research in Utrecht.

    Off-center Black Holes Wanted

    Jonker and his colleagues found the mystery object while on the hunt for off-center supermassive black holes that are thought to form when two galaxies merge. (Related: "Colossal Four-Galaxy Collision Discovered."

    ...