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Science Forum

  1. 17 Apr '18 07:17 / 3 edits
    "superspintronics" is a word I just made up for this; combining superconductivity with spintronics;

    https://phys.org/news/2018-04-superconductors-currents.html

    Time will tell if this superspintronics will be even better than 'ordinary' spintronics.
    If the word "superspintronic" is a bit too long, could rename it "superspinic".
  2. Subscriber sonhouse
    Fast and Curious
    17 Apr '18 16:49
    Originally posted by @humy
    "superspintronics" is a word I just made up for this; combining superconductivity with spintronics;

    https://phys.org/news/2018-04-superconductors-currents.html

    Time will tell if this superspintronics will be even better than 'ordinary' spintronics.
    If the word "superspintronic" is a bit too long, could rename it "superspinic".
    superconspin?

    But what does it mean for technology? It might be great to have this spin thing but it is at superconductor temps, meaning we won't EVER see this stuff in our cell phones, right?
  3. 17 Apr '18 19:46
    Originally posted by @sonhouse

    But what does it mean for technology? It might be great to have this spin thing but it is at superconductor temps, meaning we won't EVER see this stuff in our cell phones, right?
    it would partly depend on whether practical not-too-expensive room temperature superconducters will ever be discovered, assuming such a thing is even physically possible, which it might not be.
  4. Subscriber WOLFE63
    Fair and Balanced
    17 Apr '18 20:25
    Originally posted by @humy
    it would partly depend on whether practical not-too-expensive room temperature superconducters will ever be discovered, assuming such a thing is even physically possible, which it might not be.
    "nano-light filament optics"

    The future of micro-device technologies.
  5. Subscriber sonhouse
    Fast and Curious
    17 Apr '18 20:48
    Originally posted by @wolfe63
    "nano-light filament optics"

    The future of micro-device technologies.
    The huge advantage of spintronics is the fact power consumption will be thousands of times less than regular TTL CMOS stuff we use now. CMOS was a big change in that for computer chips that do one and zero, in CMOS energy is only consumed when the chip flips states so if it sits unchanged, it takes almost no energy. But when you are switching in the gigahertz range, the energy used is still less but not insignificant. If we were stuck with the old TTL (Transistor transistor logic) they consume energy whether flipping bits or not, so a modern comp or memory chip would consume thousands of watts, not a few hundred or a few watts in the case of cell phone tech.

    The gist of all that is this: Fiber tech will pretty much be always consuming energy, at least as far as I know so it better be very low power to use like modern cell phone CPU's.
  6. 17 Apr '18 20:54 / 2 edits
    Originally posted by @wolfe63
    "nano-light filament optics"

    The future of micro-device technologies.
    I am afraid the laws of physics rules out photons alone going through an optical fiber less than half of the wavelength of that photon so, for example, making it impossible to send a green photon alone through a fiber only say 10nm wid. However, combining photons with excitations to form what is called 'polaritons' might be a workaround that;

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Polariton

    Polaritons in theory can squeeze through much narrower spaces than photons alone but one catch is that they would then travel many times less than c.
  7. Subscriber WOLFE63
    Fair and Balanced
    17 Apr '18 22:55
    Originally posted by @humy
    I am afraid the laws of physics rules out photons alone going through an optical fiber less than half of the wavelength of that photon so, for example, making it impossible to send a green photon alone through a fiber only say 10nm wid. However, combining photons with excitations to form what is called 'polaritons' might be a workaround that;

    https://en.wik ...[text shortened]... r spaces than photons alone but one catch is that they would then travel many times less than c.
    Good point....hadn't considered that.
    I guess I was over-focused upon power consumption and the elimination of IR squared losses.

    Can photon wave amplitude be adjusted to a suit?
  8. Subscriber sonhouse
    Fast and Curious
    18 Apr '18 17:12
    Originally posted by @wolfe63
    Good point....hadn't considered that.
    I guess I was over-focused upon power consumption and the elimination of IR squared losses.

    Can photon wave amplitude be adjusted to a suit?
    The amplitude of a light wave or any other RF signal, if the size of the fiber is right for the wavelength, which also holds for microwave waveguides, amplitude is a separate parameter uneffected by the size of the waveguide.
  9. 20 Apr '18 06:32 / 2 edits
    Originally posted by @humy
    I am afraid the laws of physics rules out photons alone going through an optical fiber less than half of the wavelength of that photon so, for example, making it impossible to send a green photon alone through a fiber only say 10nm wid. However, combining photons with excitations to form what is called 'polaritons' might be a workaround that;

    https://en.wik ...[text shortened]... r spaces than photons alone but one catch is that they would then travel many times less than c.
    here is some recent research on polaritons but this time using them to enable quasiparticles carrying photons of light to squeeze through narrow sheets of graphene;

    https://phys.org/news/2018-04-atom-atomic-lego-nanometer.html

    But my best guess is that it will be spintronics rather than polariton-based circuity that would pan out in the long run because spintronics promises to be many times more energy efficient.