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Science Forum

Science Forum

  1. 02 Mar '11 00:05
    Can anyone think of a way to test whether the glass in a new window or skylight is UV-absorbent as was specified in the contract? That is, without special chemicals or equipment and without long-term fading tests?
  2. Standard member RevRSleeker
    CerebrallyChallenged
    02 Mar '11 04:17
    Noting your point about not wishing to utilise equipments etc, I still thought this worthy of attention..I've used something similar to the products listed within the link below whilst testing for total darkness and also varying UV levels.. for plants on a grow \ flower cycle. It's a very cheap way of verifying immediate conditions. I hope it helps or failing that perhaps just something to peruse momentarily http://www.stevespanglerscience.com/experiment/00000118
  3. 02 Mar '11 05:51
    Originally posted by RevRSleeker
    Noting your point about not wishing to utilise equipments etc, I still thought this worthy of attention..I've used something similar to the products listed within the link below whilst testing for total darkness and also varying UV levels.. for plants on a grow \ flower cycle. It's a very cheap way of verifying immediate conditions. I hope it helps or fa ...[text shortened]... something to peruse momentarily http://www.stevespanglerscience.com/experiment/00000118
    Thanks, I will look at that. I am also thinking about taking photos of the transmitted light with the window "in the way" or not, but don't know if cameras pick up any UV light if it is there. Is there a modern camera geek out there?
  4. 02 Mar '11 07:42 / 1 edit
    I don't know if this would work, but its worth a try:
    Get hold of one of those UV lamps used by banks for testing whether money is genuine. Try shining it through the glass and compare the results with a normal sheet of glass. Place some money one the other side to see how much UV light is getting through.
  5. 02 Mar '11 10:32
    Sit behind the window in the sun for a while. If you get a tan, the window does not absorb UV.

    Note that standard glass absorbs UV, so for this to not absorb UV it would have to be something other than standard glass.
  6. 02 Mar '11 16:17
    Originally posted by KazetNagorra
    Sit behind the window in the sun for a while. If you get a tan, the window does not absorb UV.

    Note that standard glass absorbs UV, so for this to not absorb UV it would have to be something other than standard glass.
    Thanks everyone. I will look into the beads.

    You can buy glass that absorbs more UV than standard window glass. We have it on a couple of paintings. Typically it has a slight green color.