1. Subscribersonhouse
    Fast and Curious
    slatington, pa, usa
    Joined
    28 Dec '04
    Moves
    52619
    01 Jun '17 20:10
    http://www.space.com/37049-gravitational-wave-experiment-detects-third-black-hole-merger.html?utm_source=notification

    Looks like with the sensitivity as we have now produces a new detect about once every 3 months or so.

    But sensitivity upgrades are in the works so smaller energetic events like 2 neutron stars colliding will be seen in a few years. And other detectors online simultaneously so direction to the events can be calculated. Right now they are detected at 1, 2 and 3 billion LY out.
    But the energy of the two black hole mergers creates a burst of energy equal to the entire energy of the universe for that short period of time of the merger before it dies down. Even that amount of energy only creates a tiny amount of gravitational wave propagation though.
  2. Standard memberapathist
    looking for loot
    western colorado
    Joined
    05 Feb '11
    Moves
    9664
    18 Jun '17 12:33
    Originally posted by sonhouse
    ... smaller energetic events like 2 neutron stars colliding ...
    Pretty sure we're just talking about math.
  3. Joined
    06 Mar '12
    Moves
    625
    18 Jun '17 17:031 edit
    Interesting.
    Makes me seriously wonder what new discoveries this new science of detection could eventually lead to? Who knows.
  4. Subscribersonhouse
    Fast and Curious
    slatington, pa, usa
    Joined
    28 Dec '04
    Moves
    52619
    19 Jun '17 10:16
    Originally posted by apathist
    Pretty sure we're just talking about math.
    Did you ever look at the technology involved? It's more than 'just' math.
  5. Subscribersonhouse
    Fast and Curious
    slatington, pa, usa
    Joined
    28 Dec '04
    Moves
    52619
    19 Jun '17 11:55
    Originally posted by humy
    Interesting.
    Makes me seriously wonder what new discoveries this new science of detection could eventually lead to? Who knows.
    They will get more information as to the direction of the source when they get more detectors online, due to the difference in timing of the pulses between two or three detectors.
  6. Cosmos
    Joined
    20 May '17
    Moves
    2069
    09 Jul '17 03:511 edit
    Ok so Einstein was right again ( grav-waves).. which isn't very hard to predict if you believe in the Planck scale.
  7. Subscribersonhouse
    Fast and Curious
    slatington, pa, usa
    Joined
    28 Dec '04
    Moves
    52619
    09 Jul '17 13:41
    Originally posted by ogb
    Ok so Einstein was right again ( grav-waves).. which isn't very hard to predict if you believe in the Planck scale.
    Why would that be? Do YOU 'believe' in the Planck scale? If it was music, what would it sound like?
  8. Cosmos
    Joined
    20 May '17
    Moves
    2069
    09 Jul '17 15:17
    It's still theoretical , but it stands to reason that there is a limit . And that limit constitutes the physical "web" of the universe.
  9. Germany
    Joined
    27 Oct '08
    Moves
    3081
    09 Jul '17 17:12
    Originally posted by ogb
    Ok so Einstein was right again ( grav-waves).. which isn't very hard to predict if you believe in the Planck scale.
    Einstein's theory of gravity has nothing to do with the Planck scale - in fact the theory breaks down at that scale. General relativity is formulated in terms of the stress-energy tensor (an object akin to a mass/energy density) and has no quantization of fields whatsoever.
  10. Joined
    06 Mar '12
    Moves
    625
    09 Jul '17 17:266 edits
    Originally posted by KazetNagorra
    Einstein's theory of gravity has nothing to do with the Planck scale -
    Yes.

    relativity ≠ quantum physics

    The first is the physics deduced from the principle that speed of c is the same in all frames of reference (general relativity comes from considering that principle for accelerating frames of reference)

    The second is the physics deduced from observations indicating quantums of the very small (an odd-sounding way to word it but don't know how else to better say it)

    -two very different physics.
  11. Cosmos
    Joined
    20 May '17
    Moves
    2069
    10 Jul '17 13:49
    OK so why hasn't a Graviton particle been found ?
  12. Subscribersonhouse
    Fast and Curious
    slatington, pa, usa
    Joined
    28 Dec '04
    Moves
    52619
    10 Jul '17 14:101 edit
    Originally posted by ogb
    OK so why hasn't a Graviton particle been found ?
    Pretty much because if they are real, which is not assured, it is very very difficult to detect, much more difficult than neutrino's for instance. Pretty much by definition since none has been found to this date. But still, what would a graiviton have to do with plancks constant?
  13. Cosmos
    Joined
    20 May '17
    Moves
    2069
    10 Jul '17 14:22
    . But still, what would a graiviton have to do with plancks constant?[/b]
    Wasn't saying there is any connection, per se. But it would be important as to how Gravity works, in general. Since the Higgs Boson has been detected, CERN should be trying to detect the Graviton next.
  14. Subscribersonhouse
    Fast and Curious
    slatington, pa, usa
    Joined
    28 Dec '04
    Moves
    52619
    10 Jul '17 15:08
    Originally posted by ogb
    Wasn't saying there is any connection, per se. But it would be important as to how Gravity works, in general. Since the Higgs Boson has been detected, CERN should be trying to detect the Graviton next.
    Well you should write a paper extolling the virtues of looking directly for a gaviton.

    Here is a bit about the big guys looking exactly for that:

    http://blog.thingswedontknow.com/2016/08/search-for-the-graviton.html
Back to Top